Animal Grooming Pierre SD

Oils with omega-3 and -6 essential fatty acids work on dogs just like they do on us—by keeping hair healthy and less likely to fall out. The makers of Shed-Stop, an EFA-enriched oil blend, claim their product won’t help seasonal shedding but can reduce light, year-round shedding by 70 percent.

The PawSpa
(605) 238-5386
501 Railway
Hurley, SD
Description
Independent groomer in new salon offering grooming and boarding services to all dog and cat breeds. Shop owner has a soft heart for "bullybreeds" that often get turned away at other shops. Food, toys and supplies available. Hours are Mon-Friday 8am-6pm and Sat by appointment only. Late night appointments can be arranaged to fit your schedule

Canine Connection
(605) 884-0172
418 11th Street NW
Watertown, SD
Description
A full-service boutique open Monday thru Frida 8 am to 4:30 pm by appointment. Boutique store specializing in unique items and we carry grooming essentials. We now carry, by popular demand, organic dog food and treats.

Canine Connection
(605) 884-0172
418 11TH St NW
Watertown, SD

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Pet Grooming
(605) 886-4441
1016 5TH Ave SE
Watertown, SD

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Animaland Pet Services
(605) 393-1331
3765 Twilight Dr
Rapid City, SD
 
Shear "n" Trim Grooming
(605) 720-2109
2109 Meadowlark Drive
Sturgis, SD
Description
Happiness is a well groomed dog that get lots of TLC. Open, afternoon 1:30pm till 9:00pm. Saturdays 6:00am till 6:00pm. Lots of love and care taken with all dogs.
Services
Grooms most/all breeds of dogs, Special Care Appointments , Pet Daycare Services, Retail Pet Products Available, Vet Referred

All City Pet Care West
(605) 496-0369
3400 S Holbrook Ave
Sioux Falls, SD
 
T & Bonnie'S Grooming
(605) 348-2065
3104 W Saint Louis St
Rapid City, SD
 
Wags To Whiskers Pet Grooming
(605) 343-7112
1101 West Omaha St Ste #2
Rapid City, SD
 
All City Pet Care South - ER
(605) 496-0600
3508 S Minnesota Ave
Sioux Falls, SD
 
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Health Matters—Brush Up on Shedding Solutions

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By Vicky Uhland

You don’t need a calendar to know it’s May: irises are blooming, schoolchildren are frolicking, and your furniture and clothes are covered in dog hair. Spring and fall are the two biggest shedding seasons for dogs. The changing temperatures signal that your furry pal needs to shed his coat so he can grow a new one more appropriate for the season. Dogs with undercoats, like retrievers, German shepherds, huskies and other northern breeds, are the biggest shedders, but every breed loses some hair. That doesn’t mean you have to resign yourself to balls of fur all over your house. Here are some tips on how to reduce shedding.

• Brush. A daily, five-minute grooming can remove the excess hair Fido would otherwise deposit all over your new black pants. If you don’t have the time or patience to brush your dog every day, at least try to do it weekly with one of the new shedding rakes that reach all the way to your dog’s undercoat. CJ Puotinen, author of Natural Remedies for Dogs and Cats (Gramercy, 2003), recommends Shed Ender and Furminator grooming tools.

• Bathe. A warm bath can loosen hair, which can then be brushed away.

• Vacuum. It sounds strange, but Puotinen says vacuuming her black Labrador, Chloe, with the soft brush attachment really helps remove excess hair.

• Supplement. Oils with omega-3 and -6 essential fatty acids work on dogs just like they do on us—by keeping hair healthy and less likely to fall out. The makers of Shed-Stop, an EFA-enriched oil blend, claim their product won’t help seasonal shedding but can reduce light, year-round shedding by 70 percent. You can also try dumping a teaspoon of vegetable or fish oil on your dog’s food, but beware: It could cause loose stools. Or try giving your dog canned salmon. Be patient though—according to pet products manufacturer Doctors Foster and Smith, it will take at least two weeks and maybe as long as 12 weeks before you see results.

If your dog sheds a lot, all the time, or has bald spots, it may suffer from a more serious problem. Buddy could have a skin infection, ringworm, mange, hyperthyroidism, or Cushing’s disease. Consult your vet if you think your dog is losing too much hair.

Author: Vicky Uhland

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