Indigestion Remedies Rock Springs WY

The next time your stomach aches, take a lesson from the samurai: Eat some umeboshi, a Japanese plum that has been sun dried and pickled in brine. From the 17th to the 19th century, Japanese warriors ate umeboshi to combat stomach complaints and fatigue—and for good reason. With its intensely tart and salty flavor, it helps alleviate indigestion by reducing acidity in the stomach and by restoring the acid-base balance of the body.

John W Beckman, MD
(307) 214-0523
6821 Valley View Pl
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Raoul Boulos Joubran, MD
5511 E 21st St
Casper, WY
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wright State Univ Sch Of Med, Dayton Oh 45401
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided by:
Charles L Kuckel
(307) 635-4141
2301 House Ave
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Peter George Perakos
(307) 634-1311
5050 Powderhouse Rd
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Kenneth R Kranz
(307) 635-4141
2301 House Ave
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
William W McIntyre, MD
(307) 637-4371
5621 Blue Blf
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Ch
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided by:
Phillip Thomas Krmpotich, MD
PO Box 367
Casper, WY
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Kristina L Stefka
(307) 632-2434
820 E 17th St
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine, Geriatric Medicine

Data Provided by:
Dr.Raoul Joubran
(307) 265-1792
1441 Wilkins Circle
Casper, WY
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Wright State Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1994
Speciality
Gastroenterologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.9, out of 5 based on 5, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Kenneth Ray Kranz, MD
(307) 635-4141
2301 House Ave Ste 300
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Healing Foods - RX-Indigestion

Provided by: 

By Emily Yin

The next time your stomach aches, take a lesson from the samurai: Eat some umeboshi, a Japanese plum that has been sun dried and pickled in brine. From the 17th to the 19th century, Japanese warriors ate umeboshi to combat stomach complaints and fatigue—and for good reason. With its intensely tart and salty flavor, it helps alleviate indigestion by reducing acidity in the stomach and by restoring the acid-base balance of the body.

“As the panacea of Japanese food cures, umeboshi is beneficial for imbalances in the body, because it’s a potent alkalizing food,” says Esther Cohen, director of the Seven Bowls School of Nutrition, Nourishment, and Healing in Boulder, Colorado. “It removes stagnation in the body and encourages digestion.”

Normally, when you eat a meal, the stomach releases hydrochloric acid to start digestion. A while later the pancreas secretes bicarbonate, a base, to neutralize the acid. Without that neutralization, pancreatic enzymes can’t function, and the body doesn’t digest food efficiently. The excess acid also irritates your stomach.

Eating too many acid-forming foods, like sugar, refined carbohydrates, and meat can throw the acid-bicarbonate balance out of whack, leading to indigestion. Called the king of alkaline foods, umeboshi offers a zesty way to restore balance. “By taking 10 grams of umeboshi plums, we can neutralize the acidity created by consuming 100 grams of sugar,” Cohen says.

Umeboshi contains high levels of alkaline-forming minerals like calcium, potassium, and magnesium, which help reduce acidity. The plums’ organic acids—primarily citric and phosphoric acid—also help alkalize the body by bonding to the minerals and increasing absorption of them in the gut.

Umeboshi remains a popular Japanese remedy for acidic stomachs and indigestion, especially after eating rich foods. Aficionados usually add umeboshi—found in health food stores and Asian groceries—to rice, tea, or onigiri (rice-balls wrapped in dried seaweed). It also adds zest to broccoli, cabbage, and, when pureed, to cucumber slices and ears of corn. When seasoning sauces or salad dressings, skip the salt in favor of sliced or pureed umeboshi.

Taste it, and if umeboshi’s vibrant pink color—which comes from the shiso herb it’s pickled with—doesn’t grab your attention, the pungent flavor will.

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...