Perimenopause and Menopause Mahwah NJ

During perimenopause and menopause, however, the ovaries' activity decreases, and estrogen and progesterone cycles become more erratic—generating plenty of physical and emotional turbulence. Many women turn to synthetic hormones for relief.

Purushotham N Surapaneni, MD
(201) 818-0960
27 S Franklin Tpke
Ramsey, NJ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bangalore Med Coll, Bangalore Univ, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
Edward Leonard Isenberg, MD
Suffern, NY
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10016
Graduation Year: 1962

Data Provided by:
Zachary Julian Palace, MD
(845) 364-5098
6 Bedford Rd
Monsey, NY
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Monica Dhingra, MD
201-967-4000 x5755
2 Crooked Hl
Oakland, NJ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Lady Hardinge Med Coll, Univ Of Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi, India
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided by:
Bennett Philip Leifer, MD
(201) 444-4526
301 Godwin Ave
Midland Park, NJ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Syracuse, Coll Of Med, Syracuse Ny 13210
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
D Peter Birkett, MD
(845) 357-8088
2 Copeland Dr
Suffern, NY
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wales, Coll Of Med, Cardiff, Wales (917-18 Eff 1/1971)
Graduation Year: 1957

Data Provided by:
Joseph Book, MD
Monsey, NY
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ, Bronx Ny 10461
Graduation Year: 1961

Data Provided by:
Jocelyn O Ronquillo, MD
Monsey, NY
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of The Philippines, Coll Of Med, Manila, Philippines
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
Joel Steven Adler, MD
(201) 967-4652
44 Northgate
Wanaque, NJ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: St George'S Univ, Sch Of Med, St George'S, Grenada
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided by:
Johannes D Weltin
(845) 354-9300
728 N Main St
Spring Valley, NY
Specialty
Family Practice, Geriatric Medicine

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Healing Foods - Balancing Act

Provided by: 

By Gabriele Kushi, BFA, MEA

“The most creative force in the world is the postmenopausal woman with zest,” said cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead. Indeed, many women describe the years following menopause as a renaissance—a time when identity strengthens, goals crystallize, and the spirit reawakens.

Of course, to those in the throes of that transition, the promise of wise womanhood does little to alleviate the pangs of getting there: the hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, low libido, mental fogginess, and the numerous other insults associated with the “change.” These perimenopausal and menopausal symptoms vary in intensity from person to person and can last one to five years.

The culprits behind much of menopausal malaise? Fluctuating levels of estrogen and progesterone hormones. Your ovaries produce estrogen at the highest levels one to two weeks into the menstrual cycle, while the egg-carrying follicle develops. After the egg is released, the vacant follicle becomes a corpus luteum and begins secreting progesterone. These hormones play important roles in regulating temperature, metabolism, mood, bone formation, and other physiological processes.

During perimenopause and menopause, however, the ovaries’ activity decreases, and estrogen and progesterone cycles become more erratic—generating plenty of physical and emotional turbulence. Many women turn to synthetic hormones for relief. But while hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may be called for in some circumstances, it can trigger side effects such as headaches, breast tenderness, and weight gain and, more seriously, raise the risk of certain diseases. A landmark study by the Women’s Health Initiative in 2002 examined more than 16,000 postmenopausal women. The researchers found that those who’d taken synthetic estrogen plus progestin for five years had a 26 percent higher risk of breast cancer, 41 percent higher risk of stroke, and a 29 percent higher risk of heart attack compared to women who had taken a placebo. The massive study overturned the acceptance of (HRT) as the first choice for women’s menopausal health.

Natural methods for cooling the menopausal fires, consequently, make a whole lot of sense. A good place to start is with the foods you eat. A healthy diet helps balance hormones and improve well-being. A not-so-healthy one, on the other hand, can aggravate an already off-balanced system. To make navigating all this easier, we’ve put together a list of foods—five to shun and five to embrace during or even well before menopause. After all, estrogen production in the ovaries starts to fluctuate when you’re in your mid-30s, long before your periods end. So adopting healthy, whole-foods habits early on will help prevent the hormonal roller coaster later in life and allow you to more fully embrace the gifts menopause brings.

Five Triggers

• Sugar and refined carbohydrates.

Author: Gabriele Kushi

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