Raw Diets Oklahoma City OK

Scientific research also supports the health benefits of raw foods. In a review of 11 studies examining the relationship between vegetable intake and cancer risk, for example, nine of the studies found that eating more raw vegetables lowered your risk of breast, lung, and colorectal cancers.

Elisa Anne Crouse, MD
(405) 271-7449
825 NE 10th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Nutrition
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Washington Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63110
Graduation Year: 1989
Hospital
Hospital: St Anthony Hospital, Oklahoma City, Ok; Presbyterian Hospital, Oklahoma City, Ok; Veterans Affairs Med Ctr, Oklahoma City, Ok; Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Ok; Childrens Hosp Of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Ok; University Hospital, Oklahoma Ci

Data Provided by:
Linda J Lavender
(405) 396-3366
10150 Stone Gate Way, Ste.101
Arcadia, OK
Company
NutraVine, LLC
Industry
Herbalist, Naturopathic Doctor (ND), Nutritionist
Specialties & Therapies
Specialties : Hypothyroid, Fibromyalgia, Cancer, Asthma

Therapies : Whole Foods Cooking, , Nutritional Counseling, Massage Therapy, Lymphatic Facilitation, Hydrotherapy, Flower Essence Therapy, Enzyme Therapy, Botanical Medicine, Aromatherapy, Prenatal Care
Insurance
None
Professional Affiliations
American Holistic Medical Association, American College for Advancement in Medicine

Data Provided by:
Rebecca A Swisher
(405) 271-6764
1200 N Phillips Ave,# 4500
Oklahoma City, OK
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Michelle E Dennison-Farri
(405) 271-3050
825 NE 10th St,# 4300
Oklahoma City, OK
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Jenny Craig
(405) 842-9797
5801 N May Ave
Oklahoma City, OK
Alternate Phone Number
(405) 842-9797
Services
Weight Loss, Diet Plans

Wael H Refai, MD
(405) 606-4839
3300 NW Expressway
Edmond, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Aleppo, Fac Of Med, Aleppo, Syria
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Cheryl Copeland
(405) 271-5390
1200 Everett Dr,# Bnp60
Oklahoma City, OK
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Sandra M Richardson
(405) 271-2113
1600 N Phillips Ave
Oklahoma City, OK
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Marilyn R Dougherty
(405) 272-5407
6201 N Santa Fe Ave,# 2000
Oklahoma City, OK
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Jennifer H Postlethwaite
(405) 235-6466
500 SW 44th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

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Healing Foods—The Raw Life

Provided by: 

By Lisa Turner

I went raw once, and I did so with a great deal of enthusiasm for the health benefits I would accrue. Certainly, eating only uncooked food seemed easy enough. Make a bunch of salads, gorge on apples and oranges, sprout some nuts and beans—piece of cake, I thought. After three weeks, all I wanted was a piece of cake. And bread. And hot, hot soups. Slowly but surely, after two months, I returned to my old eating habits, and to my beloved stove. I didn’t know what I know now: that with a few simple tricks, you can conquer your cooked-food cravings, as well as other common obstacles to the raw foods diet.

The payoff for eating raw foods makes it worth it. When you cook food above 114 degrees, it destroys the enzymes that help you digest and assimilate the food. High temperatures also alter the chemical structure of vital nutrients. Overall, “You lose 50 percent of the protein, 80 percent of the vitamins and minerals, and about 95 percent of the phytonutrients,” says Gabriel Cousens, MD, author of Rainbow Green Live-Food Cuisine (North Atlantic Books, 2003).

By enhancing nutrient absorption and making digestion easier, raw foods allow the body to spend its energy on other important functions. “If the body’s working on trying to digest heavy, difficult-to-process food, it can’t focus on healing,” says Natalia Rose, author of The Raw Foods Detox Diet (Regan Books, 2005). The potential benefit of going raw? More radiant health. Says Cousens: “A live foods diet decreases inflammation, slows the aging process, increases immunity and energy, and results in increased mental, physical, and spiritual well-being.”

Scientific research also supports the health benefits of raw foods. In a review of 11 studies examining the relationship between vegetable intake and cancer risk, for example, nine of the studies found that eating more raw vegetables lowered your risk of breast, lung, and colorectal cancers. The study’s authors suggest the reason for the correlation may be that cooking food reduces the availability of some nutrients and makes the food harder to digest.

Keep in mind though that cooking your food does carry some advantages—besides the yummy taste. Heat actually makes some nutrients, like lycopene in tomatoes, more bioavailable by breaking down the plant’s cell wall. Cooking also destroys so-called “anti-nutrients,” for example, phytates in grains and legumes (which block mineral absorption), as well as trypsin inhibitors in nuts and legumes (which hamper protein digestion). However, soaking and sprouting raw food, helps destroy these compounds, too.

More importantly, raw foods don’t work for everyone. Both Traditional Chinese Medicine and ayurvedic traditions teach that uncooked foods cool the body and may actually require more energy to digest. Thus, people who naturally tend to feel cold or dry should avoid them. “

Author: Lisa Turner

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