Blood Clot Specialist Boston MA

Over a lifetime, you have roughly a one in 20 chance of getting DVT—which equates to about 2 million Americans annually. Not all of those blood clots break free, although more than half a million Americans end up in the hospital to treat either the clot or a pulmonary embolism. And not everyone is satisfied with the current standard of treatment.

David E Schwartz, MD
(978) 927-4110
77 Herrick St
Beverly, MA
Business
The Medical Group Inc
Specialties
Cardiology

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Stephanie L Lee
(617) 638-7470
732 Harrison Ave
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Data Provided by:
Jan N Lessem, MD, PHD, FACC
(215) 956-2206
650 Albany St
Boston, MA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

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Jordan T Shin
(617) 724-6750
55 Fruit St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Carey David Kimmelstiel, MD
(613) 636-5914
750 Washington St # 264
Boston, MA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided by:
Gerasimos D Zervos
(617) 724-3600
55 Fruit Street Yaw 5
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

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George John Philippides, MD
(617) 638-8701
88 E Newton St
Boston, MA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ, Bronx Ny 10461
Graduation Year: 1985

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Gordon Spencer Huggins
(617) 636-2807
750 Washington St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease

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Stephen G Pauker
(617) 636-5000
750 Washington St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Pantel Steve Vokonas, MD
617-232-9500 x46400
80 E Concord St # B613
Boston, MA
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oh State Univ Coll Of Med, Columbus Oh 43210
Graduation Year: 1964

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Healing Blood Clots Naturally

Provided by: 

By Dan Orzech

While on a 10-day camping trip in the backwoods of West Virginia, Rusty Neithammer noticed his calf starting to swell. It didn’t hurt, and Neithammer, a 45-year-old electrical engineer, shrugged it off as an insect bite. Back home, however, his doctor sent him to get an ultrasound. The diagnosis: deep vein thrombosis or DVT. In layman’s terms, a blood clot.

Neithammer was lucky. The clot could have killed him. He’d gone to the doctor not so much for his leg, but because he’d noticed shortness of breath while hiking. Part of the blood clot had broken off and traveled from his leg to his lungs. Doctors call this a pulmonary embolism—a blockage of blood flow to the lungs—and each year, more than 200,000 people in the US die from it.

Over a lifetime, you have roughly a one in 20 chance of getting DVT—which equates to about 2 million Americans annually. Not all of those blood clots break free, although more than half a million Americans end up in the hospital to treat either the clot or a pulmonary embolism. And not everyone is satisfied with the current standard of treatment. Some DVT patients—Neithammer included—are searching for alternative remedies.

Pump it up

In most cases, doctors don’t really know what causes DVT. Researchers are, however, beginning to identify factors that increase your risk for them. Powerful calf, quad, and hamstring muscles surround the veins in our legs. Along with making movement possible, the action of these muscles pumps blood back to the heart. When we sit or lie still for too long, blood may pool in the legs, providing an opportunity for the stagnant blood to congeal and clot. That puts immobilized hospital patients at risk, but even sitting still for shorter periods—on an airplane flight, for example—may pose a problem. A number of studies in the past few years point to airline travel as a potential contributor to DVT, and some international carriers now suggest passengers get up and move their legs as much as possible. Being trapped and immobilized behind a snoring passenger in the aisle seat may not be the only danger you face, however. Changes in air pressure or oxygen levels in planes may also up your risk for DVT. A 2006 study in the British medical journal Lancet found that people on an eight-hour flight were more likely to get blood clots than people sitting in a movie theater for the same period. But other studies using pressure chambers to simulate the changes in air pressure inside an airplane didn’t find the same risk. Traveling by car, train, or bus also predisposes you to clots.

Other risk factors exist as well. Pregnant women are five times more likely to develop DVT, apparently because the body ups the blood’s tendency to clot to prevent excessive bleeding during childbirth. The estrogen in birth-control pills also facilitates clotting and puts women at a three to six times higher risk than women not on the Pill. The Factor V Leiden gene (which you can get tested for) p...

Author: Dan Orzech

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