Libido Specialist Boston MA

Flagging libido—and the problems it can cause when partners are out of sync—has become a major sexual issue for American couples. Indeed, the landmark “Sex in America” survey from researchers at the University of Chicago estimates that about one'third of women and 16 percent of men have little or no interest in sex, making this the leading sexual problem among women and number three for men.

Robert Oates, MD
(617) 638-8485
720 Harrison Ave
Boston, MA
Business
Boston University Medical Center Urologists
Specialties
Urology

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Alex F Althausen, MD
(617) 523-5250
1 Hawthorne Pl Bldg 1ROOM109
Boston, MA
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1966
Hospital
Hospital: Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Boston, Ma
Group Practice: Althausen-Mc Govern Assoc Inc

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Ralph M Zagha, MD
(781) 256-8098
8 Whittier Pl Apt 8D
Boston, MA
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 2000

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David S Wang
(617) 638-8485
720 Harrison Ave
Boston, MA
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Howard Hyukjin Kim, MD
(617) 726-3010
2 Hawthorne Pl Apt 11F
Boston, MA
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, San Francisco, Sch Of Med, San Francisco Ca 94143
Graduation Year: 2001

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Jerry R Rittenhouse, MD
(781) 979-0661
3 Woodland Rd
Stoneham, MA
Business
Mystic Valley Urological Associates Inc
Specialties
Urology

Data Provided by:
Sonita Marie Sadio, MD
(617) 726-8079
55 Fruit St
Boston, MA
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Robert D Oates
(617) 638-8485
720 Harrison Ave
Boston, MA
Specialty
Urology

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Dr.SONITA SADIO
(617) 726-2066
55 Fruit St # 148
Boston, MA
Gender
F
Speciality
Urologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.1, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

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Dr.Adam Feldman
(617) 726-2797
55 Fruit St # 148
Boston, MA
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ma Med Sch
Year of Graduation: 2000
Speciality
Urologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

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Heal Thyself - Spotlight on Your Libido

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By Michael Castleman

After 14 years of marriage, sex unraveled gradually for Jon and Lisa Lomax. For years, the two Houston high school teachers had enjoyed making love about once a week. But when Lisa, 47, became menopausal, little by little her interest ebbed. Over the course of a year, her libido waned until she wanted sex only once a month. “We loved each other and were good at working out our issues,” Jon recalls, “but we started resenting each other and fighting about our sexual frequency, which turned Lisa off even more—and frustrated the hell out of me.”

Sex evaporated even more quickly for Annie Wilson∗ of Scotts Valley, California, and her then-husband, Rich∗. The couple—she 30, he 35—enjoyed sex several times a week. Then, over a few months, for no apparent reason Annie’s libido practically vanished. “We did it maybe once a month,” she recalls, “and that was more than I wanted to.”

Flagging libido—and the problems it can cause when partners are out of sync—has become a major sexual issue for American couples. Indeed, the landmark “Sex in America” survey from researchers at the University of Chicago estimates that about one-third of women and 16 percent of men have little or no interest in sex, making this the leading sexual problem among women and number three for men.

When couples first fall in love, they can’t keep their hands off each other (remember that?). But the honeymoon doesn’t last. “With kids, career demands, and budgeting for a new roof, sex often takes a backseat,” says Louanne Weston, a Fair Oaks, California, sex therapist. And partners’ libidos don’t always decline in tandem, a disparity that’s a surefire recipe for conflict and can lead to a vicious cycle: The one who wants more sex feels rejected and unloved; the one who wants less feels besieged and unloved. Each resents the other, and sex feels more and more like a mirage in the desert.

Fortunately, desire can be revived. Some simple adjustments in the way you and your partner approach sex can make a big difference. And recent research shows that several supplements and herbs—among them, plants revered for centuries as aphrodisiacs—can help, too. Here are your best bets for reigniting the embers of lost lust.

Make sex dates
“Many people think the best sex is spontaneous,” says sex therapist Dennis Sugrue of the University of Michigan Medical School, coauthor of Sex Matters for Women. “But scheduled sex can still be great sex.”

Wait just a minute, you’re probably thinking: Doesn’t that put sex on par with dental checkups and car tune-ups?

Absolutely not, say the experts. With scheduled sex, you both know exactly when you’ll do it, which is usually a tremendous relief for both partners. “The one who wants more knows there will be sex on a certain date and can look forward to it,” Weston says. “The one who wants less knows sex will happen only on certain days, and gets a break from fending off advances—which can help that person get psy...

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