Prediabetes & Prevention Oroville CA

The problem of prediabetes, defined as overly high blood sugar (a fasting glucose level of 100 to 125 milligrams per deciliter or a two-hour glucose reading of 140 to 99), isn't just that it's the stepping'stone to the full-blown disease.

Richard James Powell, MD
(530) 891-0982
3343 Cory Canyon Rd
Butte Valley, CA
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Auto De Ciudad Juarez, Esc De Med, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua
Graduation Year: 1978

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Richard Richard Cherlin MD
(408) 358-2663
15899 Los Gatos Almaden Rd
Los Gatos, CA
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

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Ellen A Snowden, MD
(916) 568-2125
2288 Auburn Blvd
Sacramento, CA
Business
NewLife Fertility Center
Specialties
Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility

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Jennifer Lee, MD
(650) 867-3147
185 Berry St Lbby 4STE5700
San Francisco, CA
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

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Robert Alan Marcus, MD
(650) 964-1438
1386 Cuernavaca Circulo
Mountain View, CA
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Stanford Univ Sch Of Med, Stanford Ca 94305
Graduation Year: 1966

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Francis Polansky, MD
(650) 322-0500
1681 El Camino Real
Palo Alto, CA
Business
Nova In Vitro Fertilization
Specialties
Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility

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Lawrence Werlin, MD
(949) 726-0600
4900 Barranca Pkwy
Irvine, CA
Business
Coastal Fertility Medical Center
Specialties
Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility

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Ricardo Homero Castillo, MD
(651) 738-7951
750 Welch Rd
Palo Alto, CA
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Los Angeles, Ucla Sch Of Med, Los Angeles Ca 90024
Graduation Year: 1974

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Raymond Irwin Fink, MD
(619) 463-1293
8851 Center Dr Ste 404
La Mesa, CA
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mc Gill Univ, Fac Of Med, Montreal, Que, Canada
Graduation Year: 1977

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David E Aftergood, MD
(310) 659-8824
99 N La Cienega Blvd Ste 107
Beverly Hills, CA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Univ Sch Of Med, New York Ny 10
Graduation Year: 1977

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Heal Thyself - Spotlight on Prediabetes

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By Christie Aschwanden

When Karen Bouse was in her late forties, a series of puzzling dizzy spells sent her to the doctor’s office. It turned out the dizziness was linked to stress, but the blood tests her doctor ordered yielded an unpleasant surprise—Bouse was prediabetic.

Like most of us, Bouse was well aware of the epidemic of diabetes that’s been wreaking havoc with the health of some 18 million Americans. But she was taken aback to learn that another 41 million of us suffer from prediabetes—a condition that’s risky in its own right—and that she was one of them.

The problem of prediabetes, defined as overly high blood sugar (a fasting glucose level of 100 to 125 milligrams per deciliter or a two-hour glucose reading of 140 to 99), isn’t just that it’s the stepping-stone to the full-blown disease. A study of more than a million people published last January found that just being prediabetic was linked to developing, and dying from, several types of cancer. “And simply having blood sugar levels in the prediabetic range puts people at 50 percent greater risk of heart disease or stroke,” says Massachusetts General Hospital dietitian Linda Delahanty, author of Beating Diabetes.

For Bouse, now 62, these statistics hit close to home. Her diabetic mother had her first heart attack at age 56 and died at 62. Among her five siblings, Bouse is the only one who hasn’t either developed diabetes or suffered a heart attack.

That’s largely because she was lucky enough to have gotten tested early—something more of us should be doing, says endocrinologist Robert Rizza, president-elect of the American Diabetes Association. Since prediabetes lurks silently, most people who have it don’t have a clue they’re in danger. If you’ve been steadily gaining weight that you can’t seem to shed, don’t exercise regularly, have a family history of diabetes, or are over 45, you should have your blood sugar checked, then rechecked every three to five years.

And if it’s high, what then? At least there’s one bright spot in this dreary picture: Prediabetes can be reversed, without resorting to medication. Here’s what you need to do.

Get moving
One of the simplest ways to move yourself out of the prediabetic category is to, well, move.

A landmark study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2002 showed that building even a little exercise into your day (along with dietary changes, more about which later) can substantially cut blood sugar levels.

The trial, known as the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), enrolled 3,234 prediabetic people to examine whether diabetes could be prevented. The participants were assigned to one of three groups. One took the diabetes drug metformin, another group got a placebo, and the third started exercising and tweaked their diets.

The results were so dramatic that researchers stopped the trial early so that everyone in the study could take up the lifestyle program. People in the diet and exercise group reduced their...

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