Optometrists Boston MA

Aging takes its toll on sight. The lens becomes less transparent and flexible. And the retina—the paper'thin, light'sensitive tissue at the back of the eye that acts like the film in a camera—falters due to reduced blood supply and a lifetime of sun exposure.

Lena Adams
(617) 247-5998
352 Newbury St, Boston
Boston, MA
Business
Lena Adams Practice
Specialties
Ophthalmology, Macular Degeneration diagnosis and cure, Post-accident surgery
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: Yes

Doctor Information
Medical School: Harvard University, 1989
Additional Information
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish,Icelandic,French

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The Sheth Horsley Eye Center
(781) 712-1257
3 Woodland Rd
Stoneham, MA
Promotion
10% off of Lasik Laser Vision Correction!
Hours
Monday 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Bifocals, Cataract Surgery, Cataract Treatment, Color Contact Lenses, Contact Lens Fittings, Contact Lenses, Eye Disorder Treatment, Eye Doctors, Eye Exam, Glaucoma Surgery, Glaucoma Treatment, Laser Vision Consultation, Laser Vision Correction, Ophthalmologists, Opticians, Transition Lenses

DeBorah P Langston
(617) 573-4041
243 Charles St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Kenneth Mandell
(617) 573-4169
243 Charles St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Albert R Frederick
(617) 367-4800
50 Staniford St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Watertown Eye
(617) 752-3722
2 kingsbury ave
Watertown, MA
Hours
Monday 1:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Bifocals, Cataract Treatment, Color Contact Lenses, Contact Lens Fittings, Contact Lenses, Designer Brand Eyewear, Eye Disorder Treatment, Eye Doctors, Eye Exam, Eyeglasses, Glaucoma Treatment, Laser Vision Consultation, Transition Lenses

Bonnie A Henderson
(617) 367-4800
50 Staniford St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Sandra Lora Cremers
(617) 573-3529
243 Charles St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Mark P Hatton
(617) 367-4800
50 Staniford Street
Boston, MA
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Grace Chang
(617) 573-4169
243 Charles St
Boston, MA
Specialty
Ophthalmology

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Heal Thyself—Sight for Life

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By Julia Van Tine

Aging takes its toll on sight. Over the years the surface of the cornea—the eye’s tough, clear outer covering—flattens, admitting less light into the eye. The lens becomes less transparent and flexible. And the retina—the paper-thin, light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye that acts like the film in a camera—falters due to reduced blood supply and a lifetime of sun exposure.

Much of this damage is caused by free radicals, molecular by-products of normal body functioning. Damage also is caused by environmental toxins and a nutrient-poor diet. Left unchecked, a lifetime of free-radical assault on the eyes can raise the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts and glaucoma, the three most common causes of sight-threatening eye diseases in people over 40. AMD occurs when cells in the macula—the part of the retina responsible for central vision—break down. Cataracts are clumps of protein that cloud the lens, making you see the world as if through fingerprint-smeared glasses. Glaucoma damages the optic nerve and causes vision loss and blindness.

But fear not. The eyes respond remarkably well to healthy lifestyle changes, especially dietary changes, says Robert Abel, M.D., an ophthalmologist in Wilmington, Del., who takes an integrative approach to eye disease prevention and treatment.

Here are some tips from the experts on how you can help prevent age-related eye disease.

Eat in Technicolor
Eating a salad each day—the more colorful, the better—is the simplest way to boost your antioxidant intake. Here’s what to toss in the salad bowl:
• Spinach, broccoli and leafy greens. They’re rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, pigments in the carotenoid family of anti-oxidants, and they accumulate in the macula, shielding it from the sun’s vision-robbing ultraviolet rays. A 1994 study conducted by the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston found that older people who consumed 6 mg of lutein a day—the equivalent of a half-cup of spinach—had a 43 percent lower risk of AMD than normal.
• Tomatoes and red peppers. They’re excellent sources of vitamin C. An analysis from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II), conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics in Hyattesville, Md., linked higher levels of vitamin C in the diet with lower risk of cataracts.
• Onions and garlic. They contain sulfur, which helps form glutathione. “Because it protects the lens, glutathione helps prevent cataracts,” Abel says. • Carrots and other deep orange or yellow vegetables. They’re rich in the carotenoid beta-carotene, converted into vitamin A in the body. In one epidemiological study, people who ate the most beta-carotene-rich fruits and vegetables had the lowest risk for AMD.
Note: Use a homemade dressing made with olive or flaxseed oil, says Kevin Conroy, N.D., a professor at Bastyr University in Seattle. Even low-fat, low-cal bottled dressings can contain saturated or trans fats, which ...

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