Hair Loss Treatment Billings MT

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Dr.Albert Reynaud
(406) 238-2500
2825 8th Avenue North
Billings, MT
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Tx Tech Univ Hlth Sci Ctr Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1979
Speciality
Dermatologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Albert C Reynaud
(406) 238-2500
2825 8th Ave N
Billings, MT
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Roberta Jo Hawk, MD
(406) 238-6115
2900 12th Ave N
Billings, MT
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: St Vincent Hosp & Health Ctr, Billings, Mt
Group Practice: Yellowstone Dermatology Clinic

Data Provided by:
Douglas Clark Parker, MD
1233 N 30th St
Billings, MT
Specialties
Dermatology, Dermatopathology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med, Atlanta Ga 30322
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided by:
Dr.Gail Kleman
(406) 238-2500
2825 8th Avenue North
Billings, MT
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Baylor Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1992
Speciality
Dermatologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Joseph M Wentzell
(406) 238-2500
2825 8th Ave N
Billings, MT
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Mark S Jones
(406) 238-2500
2825 8th Ave N
Billings, MT
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Thomas Patrick Gormley, MD
(406) 238-2463
2825 8th Ave N
Billings, MT
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1962

Data Provided by:
William Hudson Smoot, MD
(406) 238-6115
2900 12th Ave N Ste 240W
Billings, MT
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mo, Columbia Sch Of Med, Columbia Mo 65212
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided by:
Juliana Hicks, MD
(406) 238-6115
2900 12th Ave N
Billings, MT
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1974

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Heading off Hair Loss

Provided by: 

Good nutrition, low stress and invigorating scalp massages may help you keep your locks longer.

The men in my family have stoically accepted their early hair loss. Finding no suitable alternative, my father and brother compensate by sporting dashing beards. But when my mother’s once thick hair began to thin, around age 50, she anxiously searched for a solution. “My doctor told me my thyroid medication would take care of it, but it didn’t,” she says. “So I picked up a bottle of Rogaine; but after reading the label for possible side effects, I said, ‘No thanks, I’ll leave the facial hair [a potential side effect] to the men.’”

The most common form of hair loss is hereditary (androgenetic alopecia), so my family’s fate could eventually affect me—and more likely my two sons. While men have a 50 percent chance of losing their hair by age 50, up to 25 percent of premenopausal women and 38 percent of postmenopausal women will lose some, too. Men typically lose it from the temple and crown, known as male pattern baldness (MPB), while women lose it diffusely over the front and top of the scalp, known as female pattern baldness (FPB).

New research published in the American Journal of Human Genetics finally identified the culprit—a gene variant related to male sex hormones that is located in the X chromosome, so we really can blame mothers, at least
partially. “The problem is that even if you are in perfect health, you can still lose your hair from MPB or FPB because, no matter what you do, it’s genetically programmed to happen,” says Ted Daly, MD, dermatology director at Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow, N.Y.

If balding is part of your family history, take heart. Hereditary hair loss happens gradually, so attacking the problem early can sometimes slow the process. In addition, not all hair loss is hereditary, so hair loss that looks like MPB or FPB may actually have a combination of causes—many of them reversible. For example, the root cause of my mother’s thinning hair could be heredity, or it could be her hypothyroidism coupled with certain medications she takes. Dietary deficiencies could also exacerbate it.

Hair loss is a common side effect of prescriptions like oral contraceptives, acne medications, antidepressants, blood thinners and a host of others. Trauma and deep-rooted stress can cause hair to fall out by the handfuls (called telogen effluvium), and an autoimmune condition called alopecia areata causes hair to fall out in patches. In addition, tight hairstyles like cornrows and over-processing such as frequent straightening can damage hair follicles or fibers, resulting in hair loss. Different causes call for different solutions, so see a health practitioner well-versed in hair loss issues for an accurate diagnosis (see “Tress Tests” below).

Feed your follicles

While no one solution exists for every type of hair lossa well-balanced diet is key for normal growth. “If you’re eating too much or too little protein, or i...

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