Gastroenterologists Pryor OK

Scatological jokes aside, it turns out that a lot can go wrong after you swallow your supplements or eat a meal. Digestion and absorption might seem like straightforward processes, but for many people, the 30-foot-long digestive tract can hold a series of ambushes on your nutrients.

Stephen Carlos Medina, MD
(918) 343-2728
201 W Blue Starr Dr
Claremore, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
DeBorah Sue Blalock
(405) 272-6909
608 Nw 9th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Radha Narayanan, MD
(405) 528-2552
701 NE 10th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Charles Lawrence Cannon, MD
(580) 233-2176
620 S Madison St Ste 201
Enid, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1989
Hospital
Hospital: Integris Bass Baptist Health C, Enid, Ok

Data Provided by:
Thomas Joseph Sferra
(405) 271-5884
940 Ne 13th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialty
Pediatric Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Stephen Carlos Medina
(918) 343-2728
1501 N. Florence
Claremore, OK
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Mark Harris Mellow
(405) 713-4430
3366 Nw Expressway St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Marilyn Gregory Porter, MD
(405) 943-5677
3434 NW 56th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1956
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Ok
Group Practice: Porter Medical Assoc Inc

Data Provided by:
Syed Mohammad I H Rizvi, MD
(405) 271-5428
17025 Kemble Ln
Edmond, OK
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Dow Med Coll, Univ Of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Gerard Kevin Donovan
(918) 619-4300
2815 S Sheridan Rd
Tulsa, OK
Specialty
Pediatric Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
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Gut Check

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By Jack Challem

Why you don’t absorb the nutrients you should—and what you can do about it

A few years ago, while I was chatting with a nutritionally oriented physician, the conversation drifted to absorption. I asked him how a person really knows if he’s absorbing the supplements he’s taking. The doctor chuckled. “If your supplements go ping in the toilet,” he said, “it’s a sure sign that you’re not absorbing them.”

Scatological jokes aside, it turns out that a lot can go wrong after you swallow your supplements or eat a meal. Digestion and absorption might seem like straightforward processes, but for many people, the 30-foot-long digestive tract can hold a series of ambushes on your nutrients. And worse, some of the problems may arise from the very supplements you take.

The bottom line? You aren’t what you eat. You are what you absorb. The good news is that most bioavailability (the degree to which a nutrient is absorbed into your system and thus physiologically available) problems are relatively easy to solve. We’ve investigated seven of the most common, and we offer clear recommendations to help you get the most out of your supplements and foods.

the tighter the pill

problem: Not all supplements are created equal. Occasionally, tablets get pressed too tightly during manufacturing, so they take much longer to break down and instead wind up passing through your system either partially or wholly unused.

Vitamin companies follow US Pharmacopoeia manufacturing guidelines, which stipulate that a tablet must break apart in your gut in 30 to 60 minutes. That doesn’t always happen, making tablet absorption difficult. Over the past 20 years, many vitamin companies have shifted from tablets to soft- and hard-gel capsules because digestive juices break down the thin gel wall more rapidly to release the capsule’s ingredients.

Excipients pose another potential problem, especially in tablets. These compounds aid consistency in supplement manufacturing; the name is really an umbrella term for fillers, binders, lubricants, and disintegrants. Excipients are technically safe and approved by the FDA, but just because they’re safe doesn’t mean you want these artificial colors and sugars in your vitamins.

Capsules contain fewer excipients than tablets because capsule ingredients don’t have to be pressed together to form a tablet. Tableting machines stamp out tablets in fixed sizes, so companies often have to make a tablet bigger than is strictly necessary to deliver a certain dose. They do that by adding more excipients to the mix. Capsules use excipients to ensure that the powdered mixture is consistent and to fill up a hard-gel capsule so it doesn’t look half empty. Generally speaking health-food store brands of capsules and tablets contain fewer and less-noxious excipients than drugstore or discount brands. In health-food brands, the most common excipient is plant cellulose; drugstore brands usually choose lactose. Cellulose is innocuous, ...

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