Gum Disease Specialist Pendleton OR

When it comes to brushing our teeth, Khalsa suggests we think outside of the plastic box. Indigenous peoples have always used natural toothbrushes—made from twigs—not only for their sustainability but for the medicinal qualities of the healing plants from which they're chosen.

Nels Robert Nelson, DMD
(541) 276-7051
2801 SW Nye Ave
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry

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Lawrence Eugene Chvilicek, DDS
(541) 276-1561
1100 Southgate Ste 17
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry

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Loc Vuu, DDS
2801 SW Nye Ave.
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry
Office Hours
Monday: -
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday: 6:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday: -
Sunday: -
PracticeName
Pendleton Family Dental

Data Provided by:
Donald Benschoter, D.M.D., F.A.G.D.
1100 Southgate Ste 17
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry
Office Hours
Monday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 8:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday: 5:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: -
Saturday: -
Sunday: -
PracticeName
Medical Center Dental Office, LLC

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A Scott Herman, DDS
311 SE Dorion Ave
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry

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Ritchie Hibbert, D.M.D.
1100 Southgate Ste 3
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry

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T Glen Smith, DDS
(541) 276-4768
310 SE 2nd St Ste 203
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry

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Robert Johnson, D.M.D.
809 SW Court Ave
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry
Office Hours
Monday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 12:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 5:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Friday: -
Saturday: -
Sunday: -

Data Provided by:
Harper L Jones, DMD
(541) 276-4867
116 S Main St Ste 1
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided by:
Jason W Tynkila, DDS
(541) 276-1561
1100 Southgate Ste 17
Pendleton, OR
Specialties
General Dentistry

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Gum Disease

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By Andrew Pollak

You brush your teeth religiously, yet your gums bleed whenever you remember to floss. Why? Like 75 percent of Americans over the age of 20, you probably have periodontal disease (PD), a long-term bacterial infection of the gums, bones, and ligaments that support the teeth and hold them firmly in place. Before you resign to losing your mind and teeth over it, consider using some herbal alternatives for this often mistreated affliction.

PD occurs when the bacteria that normally reside in the mouth surge in numbers and secrete a sticky film called plaque that covers the teeth. If not removed, the plaque can irritate the gums and cause gingivitis, a mild form of PD. If left untreated, the painless gingivitis can progress to periodontitis, a harsh inflammatory response to the toxins produced by the bacteria. “Irritation and inflammation cause gums to pull away from plaque-laden teeth, and plaque and bacteria can then advance under the gum line,” explains Seattle dietitian-nutritionist and herbalist Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa. This eventually leads to deep pockets of infection in the gums and precariously low bone levels around the teeth.

Unfortunately, brushing your teeth regularly may not be enough to prevent this severe infection. “PD is a reflection of your overall health,” Khalsa notes, which means you need to eat well and stay active to keep your immune system strong enough to prevent this chronic disease. Khalsa also suggests daily doses of echinacea, goldenseal, and vitamin C to keep your immune and glandular health up to par. “If there is one vital nutrient that can improve gum health, it’s vitamin C,” adds Ray Behm, DDS, a holistic dentist in Clearwater, Florida.

But eating health-fully won’t help your teeth if you let today’s lunch become tomorrow’s plaque. Dentists remind us to floss for good reason: Swiping the spaces between your teeth and under the gum line removes food bits as well as built-up plaque. Try natural beeswax and vegan wax flosses coated with cranberry to loosen plaque or tea tree to tackle bacteria.

When it comes to brushing our teeth, Khalsa suggests we think outside of the plastic box. Indigenous peoples have always used natural toothbrushes—made from twigs—not only for their sustainability but for the medicinal qualities of the healing plants from which they’re chosen. According to herbalist Lesley Tierra, LAc, the twigs from bay, eucalyptus, oak, fir, and juniper trees contain “volatile oils that stimulate blood circulation and tannins that tighten and cleanse the gum tissue.” Look for the twigs from these plants, as well as from neem, marshmallow, licorice, alfalfa, and horseradish, at your natural grocer’s. They’re simple to use: Just remove the bark and chew one end of the twig until its soft, fuzzy bristles become your new toothbrush.

To make brushing even more effective, grace your natural toothbrush with herbal toothpaste. Choose healing herbs that complete the pyramid of dental care: so...

Author: Andrew Pollak

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