Meditation Clinics Troutdale OR

When we speak of listening with compassion, we usually think of listening to someone else. But we must also listen to the wounded child inside of us. The wounded child in us is here in the present moment. And we can heal him or her right now.

Camas Meditation Group
360.833.0523 (Chris Robson)
Rushing Water Yoga
Camas, WA
Specialty
Non-sectarian

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Joyful Refuge Sangha
(503) 236-2872
4423 NE Tillamook
Portland, OR
Specialty
Zen

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Shakyamuni Tibetan Buddhist Center
(503) 788-6465
5403 SE Center St.
Portland, OR
Specialty
Tibetan

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Zen Community of Oregon
(866) 446-5416
Portland Dharma Center
Portland, OR
Specialty
Zen

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Diamond Way Buddhist Group, Portland
(503) 281-3631
Alameda
Portland, OR
Specialty
Tibetan Karma Kagyu

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Nityananda Institute
(503) 231-0383
PO Box 13310
Portland, OR
Specialty
Yoga

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Dzgochen Institute - Portland Chapter
(503) 649-3174
6225 NE Stanton
Portland, OR
Specialty
Tibetan Dzogchen

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Portland Insight Meditation Community
(503) 771-4123
6536 SE Duke
Portland, OR
Specialty
Vipassana

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Self-Discovery Seminars
(503) 234-7016
Portland, OR
Specialty
Non-sectarian

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Dzogchen Center Peer-Led Practice Group Portland, Oregon
(503) 284-3316
Portland, OR
Specialty
Tibetan Dzogchen

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Guided Meditations

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Enlightened Laughter
While stress causes the body’s blood vessels to contract and reduce blood flow, laughter has the opposite effect and instead induces vessel relaxation. In fact, according to a 2005 study, a good bout of laughter increases overall blood flow by 22 percent. This isn’t surprising to Madan Kataria, MD, of Mumbai, India, who’s been prescribing a dose of the giggles for years. His technique combines pranayama (yogic breathing) with goofy laughing exercises to bring oxygen, joy, and relaxation to the body and mind. His practice, he says, “is based on a scientific fact that…your body cannot tell the difference between fake and real laughter.” As a result, he explains, you will experience the same physiological and biochemical changes in the body.

Practice: Begin by slowly filling your lungs from bottom to top, expanding the belly first, followed by the rib cage, chest, and collarbones. Using your abdominal muscles to forcefully exhale while you emphasize the words, say “Ho! Ho!” twice as you push your hands forward from your chest and then “Ha! Ha!” as you push them downward. Slowly sway your entire body from left to right, and bend your knees slightly as you repeat the exercise more quickly saying, “Ho! Ho! Ha! Ha!” Adapted byMadan Kataria, MD; for more information visit laughteryoga.org .

Compassionate Listening Practice by Thich Nhat Hanh
When we speak of listening with compassion, we usually think of listening to someone else. But we must also listen to the wounded child inside of us. The wounded child in us is here in the present moment. And we can heal him or her right now.

Practice:
“My dear little wounded child, I’m here for you, ready to listen to you. Please tell me all your suffering, all your pain. I am here, really listening.” If you know how to go back to her, to him, and listen like that every day for five or 10 minutes, healing will take place. … Do that for a few weeks or a few months, the wounded child in you will be healed. Mindfulness is the energy that can help us do this. —Thich Nhat Hanh, from Anger: Wisdom to Cool the Flames

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