Seafood Restaurants Waterloo IA

Fish, especially cold-water fatty varieties, are high in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, essential fats that help prevent clogged arteries and irregular heartbeats, ease depression, and appear to impede the inflammation involved in diseases such as diabetes.

Red Lobster
(319) 234-0288
941 East San Marnan
Waterloo, IA
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

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Center For Vintage Life
(319) 272-2255
2101 Kimball Ave
Waterloo, IA
 
Red Lobster
(563) 359-7185
3420 E. Kimberly Road
Davenport, IA
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

Data Provided by:
Red Lobster
(319) 234-0288
941 East San Marnan
Waterloo, IA
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

Data Provided by:
Hooters
(515) 224-9464
1480 - 22Nd Street
West Des Moines, IA
Cuisine Type
Seafood, American/Family, Sports Bars/Pubs, Soup/Salad
Price Range
$10 - $20
Service Type
takeout, catering

Data Provided by:
Cedar Valley Fish Market
(319) 236-2965
218 Division St
Waterloo, IA

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Red Lobster
(515) 226-2150
3838 Westown Parkway
W Des Moines, IA
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

Data Provided by:
Hooters
(712) 256-2959
2910 23Rd Ave
Council Bluffs, IA
Cuisine Type
Seafood, American/Family, Sports Bars/Pubs, Soup/Salad
Price Range
$10 - $20
Service Type
takeout, catering

Data Provided by:
Red Lobster
(319) 338-6400
2671 Second Street
Coralville, IA
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

Data Provided by:
Red Lobster
(515) 232-2922
1100 Buckeye Avenue
Ames, IA
Cuisine Type
Seafood
Price Range
$10 - $20, More than $20
Service Type
delivery, catering

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Good Food - Good Fish, Bad Fish

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By Dorothy Foltz-Gray

When I was young, eating fish was more of a chore than a treat. Each summer my parents rented the ground floor of a beach house in Stone Harbor, New Jersey. The owner, who was a caterer, lived in the attic apartment, where she spent her days cooking lobster puffs and fish stews. Somehow convinced that my sister and I loved seafood, she often invited us upstairs for samples, insisting we try each new dish. Gamely, we stood in her kitchen as she worked, facing down slimy scallops, quivering cod, and cold gray bluefish.

As the summers passed, however, the sea creatures acquired appeal. Now not only do I love cooking and eating fish, I love picking it out: watching the seafood man scrape ice off a flounder or lift a red salmon steak to the scale. And I like knowing that in return for a little trouble—a few minutes at the grill, say—I’ve prepared a healthy meal.

Fish, especially cold-water fatty varieties, are high in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, essential fats that help prevent clogged arteries and irregular heartbeats, ease depression, and appear to impede the inflammation involved in diseases such as diabetes. In fact, fish is the only food, aside from seaweed, that provides eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), two important omega-3 fats. (The third, which fish also contains, is alpha linolenic acid, or ALA.) Fish is also an excellent low-calorie source of protein, B vitamins, fluoride, iodine, zinc, and iron. Canned salmon and bony sardines supply calcium, too.

Recent findings, however, have slowed my fillet knife. They boil down to one word: mercury. Last year, a study by Jane M. Hightower, an internist at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, found that of 123 patients who twice a week or more ate large ocean fish—including swordfish, ahi tuna steaks, and sea bass—89 percent had blood mercury levels either just above or up to ten times higher than the 5 parts per billion recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency. Her findings echo warnings issued by the Food and Drug Administration last January urging pregnant women, nursing mothers, and young children not to eat shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish.

Even tuna, which generally has lower levels of mercury than other brawny fish, has raised concerns because Americans eat so much of it. Just two tuna sandwiches (each packing 3 ounces of tuna) contain as much as 35 micrograms of mercury, close to the 38.5-microgram weekly limit recommended by the National Academy of Sciences and the EPA.

Mercury occurs naturally in the soil, and industrial plants pump more of it into the environment. Once mercury leaches into water, it’s converted by microorganisms into a more toxic form, methylmercury. Microorganisms, which also absorb the methylmercury, are in turn eaten by small fish. Bigger fish prey on those smaller ones, and each successive fish accumulates the mercury of the others. The bigger and older the fish, t...

Author: Dorothy Foltz-Gray

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