Back Pain Relief Tulsa OK

By Catherine Guthrie I had my first backache at age 12. It crept up on me after two weeks at a summer horseback riding camp. The unease started as periodic muscle soreness, then progressed into spasms, and ultimately settled into a continuous throb. My pediatrician diagnosed scoliosis (lateral curvature of the spine) and told my mother not to worry; the curve was a mild one. But things only got...

Tulsa Hand Therapy
(918) 791-3847
1310 E 15th St
Tulsa, OK
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Certified Hand Therapist, Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

Select Physical Therapy - Bixby
(918) 970-0966
11055 S Memorial Dr
Tulsa, OK
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, Geriatrics, Manual Therapy, McKenzie Certified Clinic, Orthopedic Care, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

ReAction Physical Therapy - Owasso
(918) 401-0904
10229 E 96th St N
Owasso, OK
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Certified Hand Therapist, Manual Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

Select Physical Therapy - Sapulpa
(918) 409-2903
1225 New Sapulpa Rd
Sapulpa, OK
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, Geriatrics, McKenzie Certified Clinic, Orthopedic Care, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

Jean J Bernard
(918) 582-6800
1809 E 13th St
Tulsa, OK
Specialty
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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Select Physical Therapy - Tulsa-51st
(918) 872-0900
12221 E 51 St
Tulsa, OK
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Tuesday 7:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Thursday 7:00 AM - 2:30 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, McKenzie Certified Clinic, Neuro Rehabilitation, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Pediatrics, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

Physical Therapy of Jenks
(918) 352-6937
715 W Main St Suite F
Jenks, OK
Promotion
For our patients residing within a 10 mile distance of our clinic, we offer free transportation to and from the clinic if you are unable to drive.
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Lymphedema Program, Manual Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

Select Physical Therapy - Owasso
(918) 401-0939
12701 D East 86Th St
Owasso, OK
Hours
Monday 6:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Wednesday 6:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Friday 6:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Manual Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Pediatrics, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

Donald Barney
(918) 340-0462
2121 S Columbia Ave
Tulsa, OK
Specialty
Sports Medicine

Data Provided by:
Annie Venugopal
(918) 744-8110
1705 E 19th Street
Tulsa, OK
Specialty
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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Get Your Back Back

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By Catherine Guthrie

I had my first backache at age 12. It crept up on me after two weeks at a summer horseback riding camp. The unease started as periodic muscle soreness, then progressed into spasms, and ultimately settled into a continuous throb. My pediatrician diagnosed scoliosis (lateral curvature of the spine) and told my mother not to worry; the curve was a mild one.

But things only got worse when I started school that fall. I swallowed prescription pain pills at lunch, fidgeted through class, and stood in the back of school assemblies, unable to endure the torture of sitting on a metal folding chair for more than a few minutes at a time.

My alarmed parents called the doctor, who recommended bed rest. At his urging, I became a couch potato. I quit the basketball team and sat on the sidelines during PE. Once a whirling dervish of energy, I spent my afternoons lying on a heating pad in front of the television, watching The Brady Bunch until my eyes burned.

As it turns out, his prescription may have been the worst health advice I’ve ever received.

Four months of inactivity later, the pain had become debilitating. Unable to sit through a full day of classes, I slunk to the principal’s office every day at lunch and waited for my mother to drive me home to the couch. One night I overheard my parents murmuring the word “surgery,” and two weeks after my 13th birthday I had a spinal fusion, which left me with a metal rod in the middle of my back.

After my operation, I spent years walking on eggshells, terrified the rod would break if I put too much stress on it. My well-meaning parents fanned my fear by warning me away from sports I’d loved. Scared I’d wind up needing another painful operation, I heeded their advice.

Much as I hated the sedentary life, I can’t fault my parents or the doctors. In the 1980s, the standard advice for any twinge, pull, or ache in the back was three to four weeks of bed rest. Not so today.

Of course, it’s not front-page news that back experts are telling patients to get moving after two or three days in bed. What is news is how vigorous their prescriptions for getting physical have become. James Rainville, one of the country’s foremost experts on exercise and back pain—he’s chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Spine Center at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston—doesn’t mince words. “Unless you stress your muscles at or near their physiological limits, you will not see any real change.”

In his ten-session program, called aggressive rehabilitation, patients lift weights, climb stairs, and move and twist in ways that would never have been considered possible for someone whose back had once landed him or her in bed. Part of the rationale for this approach is a new understanding of the mind-body connection and its role in pain.

But even for more cautious types who don’t want to go anywhere near a weight machine, there’s new advice about the best way to get moving. For long-term relief, ...

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