Frostbite Treatment Hastings NE

Treat frostnip in the field by gently warming the area in an armpit or groin, or on a companion’s stomach, while heading for shelter. Mild frostbite demands a thawing treatment. Submerge the afflicted area in 100- to 105'degree water—about the warmth of a hot shower—for 20 to 40 minutes, until the tissue regains its color and becomes pliant.

Hastings Regional Center
(402) 462-1971
4200 West Second Street
Hastings, NE
specialty
Other specialty
Hospital Type
Government, Nonfederal

Data Provided by:
Hastings Regional Center
(402) 462-1971
4200 West Second Street
Hastings, NE
Medicare Number
284002
Bed Count
232

Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital
(402) 463-4521
715 N St Joseph Ave
Hastings, NE
Specialty
Hospitals

Beatrice Comm Hosp & Hlth Ctr
(402) 228-3344
1110 North Tenth Street
Beatrice, NE
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided by:
Norfolk Regional Center
(402) 370-3400
1700 North Victory Road
Norfolk, NE
specialty
Psychiatric
Hospital Type
Government, Nonfederal

Data Provided by:
Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital
(402) 461-5110
715 North St Joseph Avenue
Hastings, NE
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided by:
Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital
(402) 463-4521
715 North St Joseph Avenue
Hastings, NE
Medicare Number
280032
Bed Count
168

Fremont Area Medical Center
(402) 721-1610
450 East 23rd Street
Fremont, NE
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Government, Nonfederal

Data Provided by:
Crete Area Medical Center
(402) 826-2102
2910 Betten Drive
Crete, NE
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Nongovernment, Not-for-profit

Data Provided by:
Pawnee County Mem Hospital
(402) 852-2231
600 'i' Street
Pawnee City, NE
specialty
General medical surgical
Hospital Type
Government, Nonfederal

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Frostbite

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By Kris Kucera

“Adventure is just bad planning,” wrote Roald Admunsen, the leader of the first expedition to reach the South Pole, in 1911. The intrepid Norwegian knew from ill-fated experience: His team suffered frostbite during their historic trek. Of course, you don’t have to vacation in Antarctica to get frostbite, or its less serious forerunner, frostnip—either can happen wherever the temperature falls below freezing. Breaking down on a desolate snow-covered road, getting lost during a day hike—the scenarios are many, but the factors remain the same, namely, a lack of preparation or common sense.

All right, enough lecturing. Jack Frost delivers, mistakes are made, and tissue gets frozen. Now what? First, assess whether the body part is frostnipped or frostbitten. In frostnip, the exposed top layers of skin freeze, go white, and feel waxy and numb, but the tissues underneath remain supple and yield to touch. Frostbite occurs as the deeper tissues freeze, giving the area a wooden and frighteningly anesthetized feel. The severity of frostbite depends on the depth of freezing—when muscle and bone freeze, amputation becomes likely.

When it comes to treatment, disregard the old wives’ dictate to rub the area with snow. The ice crystals formed within the frozen area act like knives internally, and massage exacerbates the injury. Also never thaw a frostnipped or frostbitten area if the possibility of refreezing exists. Freezing-thawing-freezing cycles devastate tissue, often causing irreparable harm.

Treat frostnip in the field by gently warming the area in an armpit or groin, or on a companion’s stomach, while heading for shelter. Mild frostbite demands a thawing treatment. Submerge the afflicted area in 100- to 105-degree water—about the warmth of a hot shower—for 20 to 40 minutes, until the tissue regains its color and becomes pliant. If the ears, nose, or cheeks are affected, delicately place a towel soaked with 100- to 105-degree water on the wound and regularly drizzle more warm water onto the cloth, keeping its temperature steady. (Do not overshoot 105 degrees, and never use dry heat.) Once rewarmed, gently wrap the area with a clean bandage; refrain from using the body part, or putting pressure on it. Painful inflammation often accompanies rewarming and recovery, so take ibuprofen or acetaminophen to stay comfortable.

Unfortunately, even mild frostbite can result in permanent tissue loss, so Holly Lucille, ND, RN, recommends the application of aloe vera gel several times a day. She points to a study from the Annals of Emergency Medicine, which showed that aloe reduced amputation rate by 35 percent by maintaining blood flow. Lucille also suggests a capsaicin cream, which works similarly by augmenting circulation at the site, along with dulling the pain.

Author: Kris Kucera

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