Geriatric Healthcare Specialist Lake Havasu City AZ

In a study recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers from Brown Medical School found that reduced glucose uptake and decreased metabolism in the hippocampus—the area of the brain associated with memory—cause neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment.

Cherlyn G Dias, MD
Tucson, AZ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Grant Med Coll, Univ Of Bombay, Bombay, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Claudia Capurro
(520) 792-1450
3601 S 6th Ave
Tucson, AZ
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Geriatric Medicine

Data Provided by:
Paul Gee
(520) 742-0999
6130 N La Cholla Blvd
Tucson, AZ
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Geriatric Medicine

Data Provided by:
Howard Ayres Silverman, MD
(610) 973-1400
5895 E Onyx Ave
Scottsdale, AZ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Family Practice
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1955
Hospital
Hospital: Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, Pa
Group Practice: Medical Associates Of The Lehigh Valley

Data Provided by:
Patricia A Coyman, DO
515 E Carefree Hwy
Phoenix, AZ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Family Practice
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hlth Sci, Coll Of Osteo Med, Kansas City Mo 64124
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Arlene V De Guzman, MD
10401 W Thunderbird Blvd
Sun City, AZ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Family Practice
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Fatima Coll Of Med, Valenzuela, Manila, Philippines
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Diana Beth Koss, MD
(623) 875-6580
25434 N Bronco Trl
Scottsdale, AZ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Az Coll Of Med, Tucson Az 85724
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided by:
Gary Jack Birnbaum, MD
(602) 370-4650
3104 E Camelback Rd Ste 406
Phoenix, AZ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine, Nephrology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Southern Ca Sch Of Med, Los Angeles Ca 90033
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Herminia G Herrera Tan, MD
(602) 876-5590
15221 N Clubgate Dr Apt 2135
Scottsdale, AZ
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Santo Tomas, Fac Of Med And Surg, Manila, Philippines
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Anthony S Vitelli, MD
(928) 729-2450
PO Box 2177
Fort Defiance, AZ
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Geriatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pittsburgh Sch Of Med, Pittsburg
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
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Food for Thought

Provided by: 

By Kris Kucera

Rarely does an extended family get a free pass from Alzheimer’s disease or diabetes mellitus. On the surface, these two afflictions appear totally unrelated —Alzheimer’s (AD), Mother Nature’s cruel version of identity theft; and diabetes, the glucose-metabolism disorder that affects both young and old alike. However, new research indicates that the two diseases behave in a similar manner.

In a study recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers from Brown Medical School found that reduced glucose uptake and decreased metabolism in the hippocampus—the area of the brain associated with memory—cause neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. This, they say, suggests that a form of diabetes, tentatively dubbed type 3, leads to AD.

Type 1 diabetes results from a severe or complete lack of insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas that controls blood sugar. Type 2, dubbed adult onset diabetes (although these days it occurs in teenagers and even younger kids), also stems from a dearth of insulin, or insulin resistance —the existing insulin molecules cannot deliver glucose through the cells’ membranes. Surprisingly, the researchers found a new form of insulin, produced in the brain, and they believe that, over time, decreasing levels of this “brain insulin” and other insulin-related proteins ultimately precipitate AD. While levels of brain insulin have no known affect on a body’s overall blood sugar, scientists have long recognized that diabetes patients are more likely to develop AD than those without the disease.

Skeptics of the Brown team’s findings argue that our brains produce so little insulin in the first place, reduced levels of the hormone can’t possibly play a significant role in AD. Regardless, the new data show that AD may be a neuroendocrine disorder, thus increasing the possibility for more effective treatments. And that gives hope to all of us who may one day be touched, directly or indirectly, by the merciless hand of AD.

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