Geriatric Healthcare Specialist Beaver PA

In a study recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers from Brown Medical School found that reduced glucose uptake and decreased metabolism in the hippocampus—the area of the brain associated with memory—cause neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment.

Mark Howard Overton, MD
(724) 378-6565
Monaca, PA
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Nevedita Saigal, MD
16687 Saint Clair Ave
East Liverpool, OH
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Maulana Azad Med Coll, Univ Of Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi, India
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided by:
Sarah B Shinn
(724) 935-2620
2591 Wexford Bayne Rd
Sewickley, PA
Specialty
Geriatric Medicine

Data Provided by:
Polina S Vassilieva, MD
(412) 780-7176
2465 Wedgewood Dr
Wexford, PA
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Second Moscow Med Inst, Russian State Med Univ, Moscow, Russia
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
Janet Dolores Vlha
(412) 366-7070
9104 Babcock Blvd
Pittsburgh, PA
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Geriatric Medicine

Data Provided by:
Paula Bonino, MD
(412) 544-1964
210 Woodlawn Rd
Cranberry Twp, PA
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Case Western Reserve Univ Sch Of Med, Cleveland Oh 44106
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided by:
Shantanu Saraswat, MD
(330) 386-4215
15122 Sprucevale Rd Apt A
East Liverpool, OH
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Family Practice
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Maulana Azad Med Coll, Univ Of Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi, India
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided by:
Stephanie Anne Studenski, MD
(913) 588-1265
321 Thorn St
Sewickley, PA
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided by:
David Andrew Nace, MD
(412) 692-2360
2650 Glenchester Rd
Wexford, PA
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Medicine-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Temple Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19140
Graduation Year: 1990
Hospital
Hospital: Upmc Presbyterian, Pittsburgh, Pa
Group Practice: Benedum Geriatric Ctr

Data Provided by:
James W Boyle
(412) 366-6841
9104 Babcock Blvd
Pittsburgh, PA
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Geriatric Medicine

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Food for Thought

Provided by: 

By Kris Kucera

Rarely does an extended family get a free pass from Alzheimer’s disease or diabetes mellitus. On the surface, these two afflictions appear totally unrelated —Alzheimer’s (AD), Mother Nature’s cruel version of identity theft; and diabetes, the glucose-metabolism disorder that affects both young and old alike. However, new research indicates that the two diseases behave in a similar manner.

In a study recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers from Brown Medical School found that reduced glucose uptake and decreased metabolism in the hippocampus—the area of the brain associated with memory—cause neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. This, they say, suggests that a form of diabetes, tentatively dubbed type 3, leads to AD.

Type 1 diabetes results from a severe or complete lack of insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas that controls blood sugar. Type 2, dubbed adult onset diabetes (although these days it occurs in teenagers and even younger kids), also stems from a dearth of insulin, or insulin resistance —the existing insulin molecules cannot deliver glucose through the cells’ membranes. Surprisingly, the researchers found a new form of insulin, produced in the brain, and they believe that, over time, decreasing levels of this “brain insulin” and other insulin-related proteins ultimately precipitate AD. While levels of brain insulin have no known affect on a body’s overall blood sugar, scientists have long recognized that diabetes patients are more likely to develop AD than those without the disease.

Skeptics of the Brown team’s findings argue that our brains produce so little insulin in the first place, reduced levels of the hormone can’t possibly play a significant role in AD. Regardless, the new data show that AD may be a neuroendocrine disorder, thus increasing the possibility for more effective treatments. And that gives hope to all of us who may one day be touched, directly or indirectly, by the merciless hand of AD.

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