Anemia Treatment Hastings NE

Although many factors can cause anemia, the most common culprit involves not getting enough iron in your diet. Iron forms the critical part of hemoglobin to which oxygen binds. No iron, no oxygen transport.

Dr. Bruce Crabtree
(402) 564-7514
2559 37th Avenue
Columbus, NE
Specialty
Biofeedback, Chiropractors, Color Therapy, Craniosacral Therapy, Detoxification Foot Bath, Flower Essences, Hair Analysis, Homeopathy, Kinesiology, Laser Therapy, Lymphatic Therapy, Magnetic Therapy, Massage Therapy, Myofascial Release, Nutrition, SpectraVision, Stone Massage, Wellness Centers
Associated Hospitals
Avenue Chiropractic & Wellness Clinic

Howard County Medical Center
(308) 754-4421
1113 Sherman St
Saint Paul, NE
 
Center for Health
(308) 534-6687
302 South Jeffers Street
North Platte, NE
Services
Yeast Syndrome, Women's Health, Wellness Training, Weight Management, Rheumatology, Polarity Therapy, Pharmacology, Pain Management, Nutrition, Metabolic Medicine, Men's Health, Massage Therapy, Internal Medicine, Homeopathy, Herbal Medicine, Healing Touch, General Practice, Gastroenterology, Functional Medicine, Fitness/Exercise, Feng Shui, Family Practice, Endocrinology, EFT, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease, Bio-identical HRT, Arthritis, Allergy, Acupuncture
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

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Norfolk Family Medicine PC
(402) 371-2326
900 W Norfolk Ave,# 100
Norfolk, NE
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Jill D. Jank
402-488-8851 
Lincoln, NE
 
Howard County Medical Center
(308) 754-4421
1113 Sherman St
Saint Paul, NE
 
Pioneer Totaltrade Medical Alarm Medical Nutrition Therapy Systems, Ll
(402) 403-5700
2505 N 24th St
Omaha, NE
 
Pioneer Totaltrade Medical Alarm Medical Nutrition Therapy Systems, Ll
(402) 403-5700
2505 N 24th St
Omaha, NE
 
Veterinary Nutritional Svc
(402) 793-5137
9477 W Oak Rd
Beatrice, NE
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Lindsay N. Salem
402-488-5413 
3201 South 33rd Street, Suite D,
Lincoln, NE
 
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Food as Medicine—RX-Anemia

Provided by: 

By Emily Yin

You take a deep breath, air fills your lungs, and oxygen travels efficiently to every part of your body, restoring energy and vitality. Not so for those with anemia. People with this condition lack sufficient red blood cells and/or hemoglobin to carry enough oxygen to muscles and other tissues. The result? Fatigue, weakness, dizziness, headaches, shortness of breath, and trouble concentrating. Anemia transforms molehill tasks into mountains.

Although many factors can cause anemia, the most common culprit involves not getting enough iron in your diet. Iron forms the critical part of hemoglobin to which oxygen binds. No iron, no oxygen transport.

In the US, iron-deficiency anemia more often afflicts menstruating or pregnant women, children under 2 who are not breastfed, athletes, and people with kidney failure or intestinal absorption problems. Vegetarians also face a higher risk, says Bob Kingelheber, DO, of the Poudre Valley Health district in Colorado. “A plant-based diet with limited animal products can lead to a deficiency in iron,” he explains, in part because the body absorbs plant-based iron less efficiently.

How much iron do you need? US dietary guidelines recommend the following daily amounts: Men ages 19 to 50: 8 mg; women 19 to 50: 18 mg; pregnant women: 27 mg; lactating women: 9 mg; and vegetarians: 32.4 mg.
Fortunately, you can up your iron intake with foods such as lentils, beans, dried fruit, green leafy vegetables, blackstrap molasses, almonds, yams, and fortified grains. “Eating these foods with vitamin C-rich fruits and vegetables, such as oranges, berries, mangos, pineapples, and melon, boosts the absorption of iron,” Kingelheber adds. Other smart strategies include cooking in cast-iron pans and steaming your vegetables so they retain more of their natural minerals.

You should also cut back (or eat separately) those foods that interfere with iron absorption: tea, coffee, red wine, calcium-rich foods, wheat bran, and unfermented soy.

Because the causes, symptoms, and treatment of anemia are complex—and overdosing with iron can be toxic—talk to your doctor before piling on the supplements or switching your diet. Even if you show no symptoms, you may want to get your iron levels checked anyway since you can eat an iron-deficient diet for five years before signs of anemia start to appear.

The bottom line: Don’t let frailty be thy name. Make sure you get the most out of the foods you eat, and you’ll be pumping iron in the gym, not getting it from a supplement bottle.

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