Apples Portland OR

medium'size apple (about as big as a tennis ball) contains roughly three grams of the stuff, and fiber has a crafty way of tricking the body into eating less. By increasing the bulk in your stomach, it makes you feel full without adding a lot of calories.

Robert George Martindale, MD
3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd
Portland, OR
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: George Washington Univ Sch Of Med & Hlth Sci, Washington Dc 20037
Graduation Year: 1984

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Kay Fields
(503) 295-7600
1962 NW Kearney
Portland, OR
Company
Acupuncture and Herbal Clinic
Industry
Acupuncturist, Nutritionist, Reiki Master

Data Provided by:
William Brewster Smith, MD
(503) 229-7246
1040 NW 22nd Ave Ste 400
Portland, OR
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Umdnj-New Jersey Med Sch, Newark Nj 07103
Graduation Year: 1972

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Foundation Natural Medicine Center
(503) 608-9160
3800 Southwest Cedar Hills Boulevard, Suite 200-D
Beaverton, OR
Services
Wellness Training, Weight Management, Supplements, Stress Management, Preventive Medicine, Nutrition, Herbal Medicine, Functional Medicine, Family Practice, Diabetes, Chiropractic, Cardiovascular Disease, Arthritis, Allergy
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Bruce Mc Laren Wolfe, MD
(800) 282-3284
2338 NW Jessamine Way
Portland, OR
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: St Louis Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63104
Graduation Year: 1967
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy San Juan Hosp, Carmichael, Ca; University Of California -Dav, Sacramento, Ca
Group Practice: Professional Svcs Grp Univ Of Ca Davis; U C Davis Medical Group Admin At Uc Davis Medical Center

Data Provided by:
Integrative Primary Care Associates
(503) 227-0350
2050 Northwest Lovejoy Street, #1
Portland, OR
Services
Yeast Syndrome, Stress Management, Preventive Medicine, Nutrition, Mind/Body Medicine, Herbal Medicine, General Practice, Functional Medicine, Family Practice
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Glenn Thomas Gerhard, MD
(503) 494-9000
3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd
Portland, OR
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided by:
M. Joy Young
(503) 309-1163
4445 NE Fremont St
Portland, OR
Company
M. Joy Young MSW, ACSW
Industry
Nutritionist, Massage Practitioner

Data Provided by:
Claudia Sage
(503) 699-2955
16463 Boones Ferry
Lake Oswego, OR
Company
Claudia Sage
Industry
Nutritionist

Data Provided by:
Providence Medical Group
(503) 216-0700
18040 SW Lower Boones Ferry Road, Suite 100
Tigard, OR
Services
Reiki, Osteopathic/Manipulation, Nutrition, Mind/Body Medicine, Family Practice
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

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Fitting in the Fiber

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By Joe Mullich

Tammi Flynn, a registered dietitian in Wenatchee, Washington, doesn’t need studies in medical journals to tell her about the showstopping benefits of fiber. When clients come to her wanting to lose weight, she advises them, as might be expected, to exercise and eat lots of fruits, vegetables, and lean proteins. However, a few years ago she also began slipping in a secret ingredient: apples. She’s found that those who follow her suggestion to eat three apples a day, one before each meal, lose 30 percent more weight, on average, than clients who followed a similar regimen, minus the apples.

How can a few apples make such a big difference? One word: fiber. A medium-size apple (about as big as a tennis ball) contains roughly three grams of the stuff, and fiber has a crafty way of tricking the body into eating less. By increasing the bulk in your stomach, it makes you feel full without adding a lot of calories.

Of course, promoting weight loss isn’t even fiber’s biggest claim to fame. Heaps of studies indicate that fiber wards off all sorts of serious diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, and diverticulitis, a common colon disorder. Just how powerful is it? A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that a cholesterol-lowering diet that included fiber-rich foods can be as effective at lowering cholesterol as drugs. Indeed, fiber’s first champion, 1870s cereal baron Dr. John Kellogg, who fed fiber-rich grains to all his patients to cure “poisons in the bowel,” would be mighty gratified to hear about its exalted status.

But he’d be puzzled by its less-than-stellar role in the popular diet plans now sweeping the country. In the Atkins, South Beach, and Glucose Revolution diets, fruits like apples—along with other good fiber sources such as beans and whole-grain breads—are downplayed in favor of fats and lean sources of protein. Why?

The answer lies in the difference between simple and complex carbohydrates—and longtime confusion between the two. Simple carbs like pastries, breads, and snack foods not only raise blood sugar levels, they often come with heaping doses of sugar, fat, and salt, and don’t contain much fiber. Complex carbohydrates, on the other hand, such as whole-grain breads, beans, fruits, and vegetables, generally don’t cause blood sugar levels to spike and do provide plenty of fiber. The diet gurus acknowledge that such carbs are healthier, but their regimens still include way fewer carbs—of both kinds—than most nutritionists recommend.

And fiber gets short shrift in the process. Some of the diets suggest fiber supplements to fill in the gap, particularly in the early stages. But the problem with this notion, say nutritionists like Leslie Bonci, a registered dietitian and author of the American Dietetic Association Guide to Better Digestion, is that supplements don’t provide the full range of nutrients found in food.

Plus, most of them contain primarily one kind of fiber: th...

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