Mental Clarity Essex Junction VT

Most physical activities, on the other hand, did not prove that helpful. Team sports and ballroom dancing were exceptions, perhaps because they require the mental rigor of working with partners or learning complex steps.

Ryan Phillip Jewell, MD
(802) 847-3072
111 Colchester Ave Fletcher 5,
Burlington, VT
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Vt Coll Of Med, Burlington Vt 05405
Graduation Year: 1999

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Rup Tandan
(802) 656-4588
1 S Prospect St
Burlington, VT
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Neurology

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Abeer Bakhiet Farrag
(802) 847-4589
111 Colchester Ave
Burlington, VT
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Neurology

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Yang Mao-Draayer
(802) 847-4589
1 S Prospect St
Burlington, VT
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Neurology

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Bruce I Tranmer
(802) 847-3072
111 Colchester Ave
Burlington, VT
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Neurosurgery

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Geoffrey E Starr
(802) 660-2500
20 Kimball Ave
South Burlington, VT
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Neurology

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Harold Hollingworth Morris
(802) 656-4588
1 S Prospect St
Burlington, VT
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Neurology

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Robert Evan Shapiro
(802) 656-4588
1 S Prospect St
Burlington, VT
Specialty
Neurology

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Nancy Ellen Binter, MD
(802) 865-2550
94 Colchester Ave
Burlington, VT
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Umdnj-Robt W Johnson Med Sch, New Brunswick Nj 08901
Graduation Year: 1981

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Mari Tobita
(802) 847-4589
111 Colchester Ave
Burlington, VT
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Exercise Your Gray Matter

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Quick: What’s a ten-letter term for mental clarity? If you said “crosswords,” write that down in pen.People who do crossword puzzles, play chess, or otherwise manage to keep their brains busy increase their chances of staying mentally sharp, according to a new report in the New England Journal of Medicine. It’s sort of like jogging for the brain.

In the study, re-searchers charted the leisure activities of people over 75 for up to 21 years (the median follow-up was five years). The volunteers lowered their risk of dementia by 7 percent for every additional day per week that included a mentally stimulating activity. People who “worked out” 11 or more times a week saw a full 63 percent drop compared to the least active players. Beneficial activities also included reading and playing other board games such as checkers and backgammon.

Most physical activities, on the other hand, did not prove that helpful. Team sports and ballroom dancing were exceptions, perhaps because they require the mental rigor of working with partners or learning complex steps. Researchers aren’t sure why mental exercise makes such a difference. One theory is that it enriches neural connections, slowing the loss that occurs naturally with age. The sooner you start working that brain, the better, says study author JoeVerghese, an assistant professor of neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. So put down that putter and pick up the morning paper instead.

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