Natural Childbirth Pain Relief Scottsville KY

When Chandra Lund discovered she was pregnant, she faced a dilemma. She wanted a natural labor, but media images of women screaming in pain haunted her, while on the other hand, her mother, an ob-gyn nurse, had shared enough experiences of complications from medical interventions, especially epidurals.

Devin Gentry Trevor, MD
Bowling Green, KY
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Louisville Sch Of Med, Louisville Ky 40202
Graduation Year: 1998

Data Provided by:
Amador Ramirez Silva, MD
PO Box 1157
Bowling Green, KY
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1954

Data Provided by:
George Thomas Bowling, MD
(318) 322-2140
1801 Ashley Cir
Bowling Green, KY
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1976
Hospital
Hospital: St Francis Med Ctr, Monroe, La

Data Provided by:
Augusta Sarah Mayfield
(670) 846-4800
1701 Ashley Cir
Bowling Green, KY
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Pediatric Internist

Data Provided by:
Kela Lyons Fee, MD
(270) 781-3415
1805 Scottsville Rd
Bowling Green, KY
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Louisville Sch Of Med, Louisville Ky 40202
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Prana Raina Bhatt, MD
Bowling Green, KY
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Gov'T Med Coll, Kashmir Univ, Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir, India
Graduation Year: 1966

Data Provided by:
Ronald Lee Hatcher, MD
(270) 781-2111
1312 Westen St
Bowling Green, KY
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med, Atlanta Ga 30322
Graduation Year: 1967

Data Provided by:
Keith Alan Hewitt, MD
(270) 781-3415
1805 Scottsville Rd.
Bowling Green, KY
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Languages
English
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Louisville Sch Of Med, Louisvill
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
Keith A Hewitt
(270) 781-3415
1805 Scottsville Rd
Bowling Green, KY
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Joe T Davis
(270) 781-3415
1805 Scottsville Rd
Bowling Green, KY
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Epidural Alternatives

Provided by: 

By Diana Reynolds Roome

When Chandra Lund discovered she was pregnant, she faced a dilemma. She wanted a natural labor, but media images of women screaming in pain haunted her, and the “horrible, painful” birth stories her friends told made her think twice. On the other hand, her mother, an ob-gyn nurse, had shared enough experiences of complications from medical interventions, especially epidurals, that “getting a needle put in my back scared me more than giving birth,” says Lund.

The Conventional Rx: Hospital birthing centers frequently administer pain medications through an epidural, which is a regional anesthesia injected through a catheter into the spine. Though effective
in reducing the pain of contractions, side effects—such as dizziness, fever, headache, and occasionally more serious complications—often outweigh the benefits. What’s more, an epidural can actually slow labor by inhibiting the natural production of birthing hormones, requiring manual intervention such as forceps or a vacuum to extract the baby.

The Alternative Rx: Self-hypnosis. With the help of Fay Kelly, a childbirth educator and hypnotherapist in San Mateo, California, Lund learned to welcome rather than fear the powerful energy that comes into play when labor starts. She and her husband practiced breathing techniques and rainbow meditation, a relaxation practice that involves focusing on colors. Soon Lund could identify the muscles and hormones that power the birthing process, and Kelly taught her visualization techniques she could use during labor to stimulate the hormones that soften and dilate the cervix. “Through self-relaxation and hypnosis techniques, you can coax your uterine muscles to let go instead of pushing,” says Kelly.

The outcome: When labor began, Lund stayed relaxed and in control. And her meditation and visualization training paid off: Lund’s labor totaled seven hours—much fewer than the average 12—with only 12 minutes in the hospital delivery room and no drugs or epidural. Her baby, Ricky, arrived calm and alert.
—Diana Reynolds Roome

Author: Diana Reynolds Roome

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