Endocrinologists Gautier MS

This page provides useful content and local businesses that give access to Endocrinologists in Gautier, MS. You will find helpful, informative articles about Endocrinologists, including "Rising to the Challenge". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Gautier, MS that will answer all of your questions about Endocrinologists.

John W DeGroote
(228) 762-5982
4211 Hospital St
Pascagoula, MS
Specialty
Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Data Provided by:
Todd William Frieze
(228) 432-5200
147 Reynoir St
Biloxi, MS
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Data Provided by:
Todd William Frieze, MD
(228) 377-6245
301 Fisher St
Keesler Afb, MS
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med, Atlanta Ga 30322
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Paul Richard Ziaya
(228) 523-5743
400 Veterans Ave
Biloxi, MS
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology

Data Provided by:
Rodrigo Valderrama, MD
(601) 815-5643
2500 N State St
Jackson, MS
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
David C Herminghuysen, MD
(228) 432-5200
147 Reynoir St Ste 305
Biloxi, MS
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Dr.TODD FRIEZE
(228) 432-5200
147 Reynoir St # 305
Biloxi, MS
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1996
Speciality
Endocrinologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Raul Enrique Ramirez, MD
(228) 396-3328
Biloxi, MS
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pr Sch Of Med, San Juan Pr 00936
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Muzaffar Bashir Piracha, MD, FACE
(228) 872-6808
2112 Bienville Blvd Ste F1
Ocean Springs, MS
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Nishtar Medical College,Pakistan: MD: 1986
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
Todd William Frieze, MD
(228) 377-6245
301 Fisher St
Keesler Afb, MS
Specialties
Endocrinology, Diabetes, & Metabolism
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med, Atlanta Ga 30322
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Rising to the Challenge

Provided by: 

By Alan Reder

Diabetes used to be a fixed sentence: If you had type-1 you faced a lifetime of insulin injections, innumerable health problems, and the prospect of an early death; type-2 simply arrived with old age, along with arthritis and high blood pressure. These days, children as young as 6 have type-2 and many seniors face diabetes-related dementia. Learn how you can sidestep the ravages of the disease through diet and lifestyle changes.

When I was growing up in the 1950s, I watched a constant stream of TV westerns, but in real life it was diabetes, not outlaws, that had me surrounded.

Every member of my immediate family, excluding me, had the disease. My mother and sister had type-1 diabetes, and later in life, my father was diagnosed with type-2, as was my maternal grandmother Molly. My Dad’s sister Thelma was a “brittle” type-1, meaning her blood sugar swung wildly between low and high. She ultimately died of diabetes complications, as did Mom, also a brittle diabetic whose disease ravaged her heart. Other casualties include Dad’s uncle Jake, who was blinded by type-1 before succumbing to it in his early 50s, and my fraternal cousin Danny, who struggles to control his type-2.

Diabetes is now tearing through the nation the way it has torn through my family. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that some 20.8 million Americans—about 7 percent of the population—are diabetic. Contrary to other health trends, diabetes is killing more people, too. Diabetes-related deaths have jumped by 45 percent since 1987, even as the death rates from heart disease, stroke, and cancer have slowed.

No mystery why, though. The diabetes epidemic—really a type-2 epidemic—is the demon spawn of junk food, channel surfing, and Internet surfing, which have long since replaced healthy food and physical activity in many American lives. The increase in type-2 diabetes correlates with America’s obesity epidemic almost as closely as thunder follows lightning. From 1991 to 2001, a CDC study found, diagnosed diabetes increased by 61 percent and obesity rates grew by 74 percent. Connecting the dots is simple because most people with type-2 diabetes, by far the most common form, are overweight.

Diabetes rarely announces itself with dramatic symptoms, so about a third of type-2s go undiagnosed. And because they’re not being treated, they could be blindsided later in life by diabetes’ serious complications. That sobering list includes kidney failure, nervous system damage, blindness, high blood pressure, hardening of the arteries, heart attack, stroke, lower limb amputations, gum disease, and pregnancy complications including birth defects.

But diabetes isn’t a death sentence or even a sentence to a compromised life. With training and diligent attention to your blood sugar levels, insulin doses, and diet, you can manage your type-1 diabetes and live a long, healthy life. Type-2 diabetes is easily prevented, and if battled aggress...

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