Orthostatic Hypotension Diagnosis & Treatment Dyersburg TN

In the US we're so preoccupied with high blood pressure and its risks (strokes, heart attacks, or heart failure) that we often overlook the dangers of low blood pressure (light-headedness, dizziness, occasional fainting spells). In fact, overzealous use of blood pressure - lowering medications is one of the primary causes of orthostatic hypotension.

Pankaj Srivastava, MD
(731) 693-0239
239 Auburn Ave
Dyersburg, TN
Specialties
Cardiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: All India Inst Of Med Sci, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, Delhi, India
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided by:
Thomas G Bartlett
(615) 269-4545
4230 Harding Rd
Nashville, TN
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Nevindranath Mangru, MD
(615) 962-0672
155 Hospital Rd Ste E
Winchester, TN
Specialties
Cardiology, Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of West Indies, Fac Med Sci, Kingston, Jamaica (950-01 Pr 1/71)
Graduation Year: 1986
Hospital
Hospital: Southern Tennessee Med Ctr, Winchester, Tn
Group Practice: Winchester Pediatrics Clinic

Data Provided by:
Frank A Mc Grew III, MD
(901) 271-1000
8060 Wolf River Blvd
Germantown, TN
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Case Western Reserve Univ Sch Of Med, Cleveland Oh 44106
Graduation Year: 1970
Hospital
Hospital: Baptist Memorial Hosp -Memphi, Memphis, Tn
Group Practice: Stern Cardiovascular Ctr

Data Provided by:
Stephen Marietta
(865) 691-4850
9330 Park West Blvd
Knoxville, TN
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Steven T Martin, MD
(901) 371-9040
4901 Raleigh Common Dr
Memphis, TN
Business
Cardiovascular Physicians of Memphis
Specialties
Cardiology

Data Provided by:
Fernando A Herrera
(901) 761-1181
6005 Park Ave Ste 828b
Memphis, TN
Specialty
Thoracic Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Cardiac Surgery

Data Provided by:
Theodore David Richards, MD
(423) 629-4106
2341 McCallie Ave Ste 200 Plaza III
Chattanooga, TN
Specialties
Cardiology, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tn, Memphis, Coll Of Med, Memphis Tn 38163
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: Erlanger Med Ctr, Chattanooga, Tn; Memorial Hospital, Chattanooga, Tn; Parkridge Med Ctr, Chattanooga, Tn
Group Practice: Diagnostic Center

Data Provided by:
Pradip K Mishra
(931) 920-0228
311 Landrum Pl
Clarksville, TN
Specialty
Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease

Data Provided by:
Norman E Liddell
(865) 428-4042
1240 Fox Meadows Boulevard
Sevierville, TN
Specialty
Cardiology

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Effects of Low Blood Pressure

Provided by: 

By Stephen T. Sinatra, MD,a Board-certified cardiologist and author of The Sinatra Solution: Metabolic Cardiology (Basic Health Publications, 2008)

Absolutely it could. If springing to your feet causes you to feel light-headed, see black or white spots, or nearly keel over, you may have orthostatic hypotension. Put simply, orthostatic hypotension—orthostatic means “standing upright” and hypotension means “low blood pressure”—is the body’s temporary inability to adjust to changes in gravity. Usually when we stand up, our bodies automatically regulate blood flow as needed—by increasing heart rate and constricting blood vessels and veins, which increases blood pressure so blood can make it up into the brain. But when people with orthostatic hypotension stand up too quickly, venous blood pools in the legs rather than returning to the heart, blood pressure falls, and the brain does not get enough oxygen to maintain consciousness.

In the US we’re so preoccupied with high blood pressure and its risks (strokes, heart attacks, or heart failure) that we often overlook the dangers of low blood pressure (light-headedness, dizziness, occasional fainting spells). In fact, overzealous use of blood pressure–lowering medications is one of the primary causes of orthostatic hypotension.

Assuming you’ve ruled out other reasons for your dizziness—low blood sugar, dehydration, anemia, heart problems, medications—you can minimize, if not eliminate, your symptoms by making these simple changes.

Eat smart
Adding more salt increases volume expansion and therefore pressure in blood vessels, which is why people with high blood pressure should avoid it and those with too low blood pressure may want to add an extra dash. But that doesn’t give you license to tear into a bag of potato chips or load up on processed food. Instead, choose healthy salt sources. Swap your generic table salt for mineral-rich kosher salt, sea salt, Himalayan salt, or Celtic salt; munch on a dill pickle; or sip a cup or two of organic canned soup once a day. A handful of organic, salted nuts (cashews or almonds) also increases your salt intake—and provides plenty of healthy protein and minerals.
Eat smaller and more frequent meals throughout the day to prevent dizziness caused by low blood sugar, which exacerbates orthostatic hypotension. Be sure to balance each meal with low-glycemic carbohydrates (fruits, vegetables, and whole grains), healthy fats (olive oil, avocado, nuts, and seeds), and lean proteins (chicken, fish, eggs, lentils, and tofu).
Caffeine can temporarily raise blood pressure, so drink one to two cups of coffee or black or green tea in the morning, when blood pressure is at its lowest.
Drink plenty of fluids since dehydration can cause low blood pressure, and cut back on alcohol, which can cause low blood sugar, aggravating orthostatic hypotension.

Step it up
Engage in light exercise to get the blood flowing, such as walking (stairs or a flat surface), up...

Author: Stephen T. Sinatra, MD

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