Flu & Cold Medicine Lafayette LA

Everyone knows echinacea is what you take when you have a cold, right? Well, maybe, maybe not. A recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that at least one species of echinacea didn’t help prevent colds or reduce the severity of cold symptoms.

Louis G. B. Mes
(337) 233-5025
1101 S. College Road
Lafayette, LA
Specialties
Cosmetic Surgery
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


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Karen R Smith MD
(337) 233-3731
601 W St Mary Blvd
Lafayette, LA
Specialties
Internal Medicine

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Rebecca Doise, MD
(337) 521-9127
4600 Ambassador Caffery Pkwy
Lafayette, LA
Business
Womens & Childrens Hospital Emergency Room
Specialties
Emergency Medicine

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Clinton Young
(337) 237-6712
850 N Pierce St
Lafayette, LA
Specialty
Internal Medicine

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David Lee McCaffree, MD
(409) 983-3351
407 Roosevelt St
Lafayette, LA
Specialties
Pediatrics, Adolescent Medicine-Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Temple Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19140
Graduation Year: 1963

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Thomas J Montgomery MD
(337) 235-2264
449 Heymann Blvd
Lafayette, LA
Specialties
Orthopedics

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Charles E Bramlet MD
(337) 991-9163
119 Rue Fountaine
Lafayette, LA
Specialties
Psychiatry & Psychology

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Scott Oaks Chiropractic
(337) 232-6000
5545 Cameron St # I
Scott, LA

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Brent J Rochon
(337) 261-5151
850 N Pierce St
Lafayette, LA
Specialty
Internal Medicine

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Bettina Alessandra FitzGerald
(337) 261-0734
2100 Jefferson St
Lafayette, LA
Specialty
Internal Medicine

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Echinacea's Rocky Road

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Everyone knows echinacea is what you take when you have a cold, right? Well, maybe, maybe not. A recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that at least one species of echinacea didn’t help prevent colds or reduce the severity of cold symptoms.

Although the study was notable in its research methods, it doesn’t mark the definitive death knell for echinacea as a cold fighter. Mark Blumenthal, founder and director of the nonprofit American Botanical Council (ABC), says that the cold/flu viruses, injected into participants noses were highly infectious, while the echinacea dosages were lower than what people would normally take—they received an equivalent of 900 mg a day of dried Echinacea angustifolia root, compared to the 3,000 mg that the World Health Organization and ABC recommend. “It would have been optimal if this trial had tested the echinacea preparation at either more frequent or higher doses,” he states.

The amount of biologically active ingredients found in the herb vary widely depending on a multitude of factors, leading the researchers to admit other “chemical constituents that were not tested [could] have important biological effects.” In fact, another study this year found that a standardized root extract from Echinacea angustifolia did, in fact, strengthen the immune systems of mice infected with Candida albicans (yeast overgrowth), as well as stimulate the production of T-cells that are vital for immunity. But don’t throw out that tincture just yet. Most doctors do still recommend echinacea for colds and flus.

—Nancy Alfaro

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