Dry Skin Care Cheyenne WY

Low humidity, central heating (especially warm air pumped through ducts) and cold, windy weather all contribute to dry, flaky, and often itchy skin during the winter months. Lotions can help temporarily, but attending to the underlying causes of dryness will benefit you more.

Dr.Sandra Surbrugg
(307) 635-0226
123 Western Hills Boulevard
Cheyenne, WY
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1981
Speciality
Dermatologist
General Information
Hospital: United Med Ctr -West, Cheyenne, Wy
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Julie A Neville
(307) 635-0226
123 Western Hills Blvd
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Mindy Diane Tanner
(307) 635-8299
2112 Seymour Ave
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Mary O Cole
(307) 635-0226
123 Western Hills Blvd
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Dr.Mary Cole
(307) 635-0226
123 Western Hills Boulevard
Cheyenne, WY
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Northwestern Univ Med Sch
Year of Graduation: 1997
Speciality
Dermatologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Cheyenne Dermatology Wyoming Laser Center
(307) 635-8299
2112 Seymour Ave
Cheyenne, WY
 
Sandra K Surbrugg
(307) 635-0226
123 Western Hills Blvd
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Larry E Seitz
(307) 635-8299
2112 Seymour Ave
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Dermatology

Data Provided by:
Sandra Kathleen Surbrugg, MD
(307) 635-0226
123 Western Hills Blvd
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med, Denver Co 80262
Graduation Year: 1981
Hospital
Hospital: United Med Ctr -West, Cheyenne, Wy
Group Practice: Cheyenne Skin Clinic

Data Provided by:
Larry Eugene Seitz, MD
(307) 635-8299
2112 Seymour Ave
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Dermatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med, Denver Co 80262
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Dry Skin Solutions

Provided by: 

Q My skin tends to get very dry in the winter. I use a lot of lotion but I’d like to know what else I can do.

A Low humidity, central heating (especially warm air pumped through ducts) and cold, windy weather all contribute to dry, flaky, and often itchy skin during the winter months. Lotions can help temporarily, but attending to the underlying causes of dryness will benefit you more.

Ayurveda attributes the drying effects of winter to an increase in vata, with its dry, cold, and moving properties. Ayurvedic theory states that our bodies take on the qualities predominant in nature during any particular season. To fight the drying qualities of winter, ayurveda recommends hydrating adequately with water but also using vegetable-based oils to protect the skin and help it hold in its own moisture.

Try adding more healthy fats to your diet during the winter. Instead of steaming your vegetables, you might stir-fry them in olive or sunflower oil, making sure to keep the heat no higher than medium so you don’t smoke the oil and degrade the fats. Also, add a teaspoon of olive oil to your grains as they cook. Ground flaxseed, nuts, and avocados are other wholesome sources of healthy oils. It’s also important that you drink enough fluids. Opt for pure spring water rather than dehydrating caffeinated drinks. Warm (or room-temperature) beverages are best during the winter. Drink one glass every one to two hours during the day.

The greatest skin secret from ayurveda lies in actually applying or massaging vegetable oils directly onto your skin. Do this before your bath or shower to protect your skin from the drying effects of the water, as well as to maximize absorption of the oil into the skin. Just after your bath, if your skin needs additional moisturizing, apply an organic lotion or skin cream to further lock in your skin’s moisture for the day.

A good oil choice for all body types? Cold-pressed and, ideally, organic olive oil. If you have very dry skin, almond oil will lubricate the skin more. For those with oily skin or strong kapha tendencies (nonsensitive skin but too much weight), sesame oil is the best choice. If you have serious fluid retention in your legs, skip the oil altogether.

For each mini-massage, you’ll need 1/8 to 1/4 cup of your oil of choice. Apply the oil to your entire body, starting with your scalp and moving down, ending with your feet. Use the palms of your hands and rub the oil in gently. Use up-and-down strokes over your long bones and circular strokes over your joints. Massage clockwise over your abdomen and up and down on your back, the best that you can reach.

After your massage, step into a warm shower or bath. Your skin should feel smoother, and your mind and body will be more relaxed and supple all day.

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