Fertility Enhancement Products Eugene OR

Don’t take melatonin supplements, which people often use to help them sleep. Melatonin can raise prolactin levels, too, and may result in temporary infertility. Read on to learn more information below.

Kimberly Ann Bock, MD
4010 Aerial Way
Eugene, OR
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided by:
Paul F Kaplan
(541) 346-2768
1232 University Of Oregon
Eugene, OR
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
George Dempsy Foster, MD
(727) 553-7500
1200 Hilyard St
Eugene, OR
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Meharry Med Coll Sch Of Med, Nashville Tn 37208
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided by:
Heather York
(541) 686-2922
590 Country Club Pkwy
Eugene, OR
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Tina Schwarz Schnapper, MD
(541) 485-8550
598 E 13th Ave
Eugene, OR
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: St Louis Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63104
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Steven Arthur Latulippe, MD
(541) 687-6000
1162 Willamette St
Eugene, OR
Specialties
Family Practice, Obstetrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loma Linda Univ Sch Of Med, Loma Linda Ca 92350
Graduation Year: 1997
Hospital
Hospital: Salem Hospital, Salem, Or; Valley Community Hospital, Dallas, Or
Group Practice: Monmouth Family Practice

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Jennifer M Tufariello, MD
(541) 686-2922
590 Country Club Pkwy Ste B
Eugene, OR
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Suny At Buffalo Sch Of Med & Biomedical Sci, Buffalo Ny 14214
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided by:
Jennifer M Tufariello
(541) 686-2922
590 Country Club Pkwy
Eugene, OR
Specialty
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Data Provided by:
Jan Honza Stafl, MD
(541) 342-8616
151 W 7th Ave Ste 110
Eugene, OR
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Northwestern Univ Med Sch, Chicago Il 60611
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Louis Anthony Marzano, MD
(541) 686-9175
923 Country Club Rd Ste 100
Eugene, OR
Specialties
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1968

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Do's and Dont's for Enhancing Fertility

Provided by: 

By Jacob Teitelbaum, MD

Q I have been trying unsuccessfully to get pregnant for the last two years. What can my husband and I do?

Actually there are a number of things you can do—and certain things you shouldn’t do—to increase your chances of conceiving. First, here’s a list of what you should give up:
• Stop or cut back on drinking coffee. Having more than four cups a day (or quite possibly, any at all) can result in infertility. In fact, some researchers joke that coffee acts as a reasonable form of birth control (I wouldn’t rely on it, though!).
• Stop drinking alcohol, especially if you have trouble ovulating. Even one drink a day can increase infertility by 30 percent; two drinks a day doubles that percentage. The reason? Alcohol increases the hormone prolactin, which inhibits the two hormones necessary for ovulation: FSH and GnRH.
• Don’t take melatonin supplements, which people often use to help them sleep. Melatonin can raise prolactin levels, too, and may result in temporary infertility.
• If you douche, stop. A recent study suggests that douching can also temporarily decrease the probability of getting pregnant by about 30 percent.
• Watch your vitamin C intake. If you are taking 1,000 mg a day or more, decrease that to 500 mg a day.
• Give up caffeinated sodas—even one a day can decrease your ability to conceive by 50 percent.
So what can you do to get pregnant?
• Take vitamins. Start with a good multivitamin with folate and magnesium. Add extra vitamin B6 (approximately 50 mg daily). This is especially helpful if you have irregular—or no—periods.
• Be sure your iron levels are adequate. A blood test (a ferritin level combined with an iron level and iron binding capacity) will tell you this. Although a ferritin level of 9 shows you have enough iron to prevent anemia, you can be infertile with ferritin levels that are less than 40 ng per ml. In a study of women with infertility who had ferritin levels less than 40, half of them quickly became pregnant when put on iron supplements.
• Get your thyroid levels checked. Even if they test within the normal range, if you have a tendency to be constipated, intolerant to cold, have dry skin or thinning hair, and your temperature hovers around 98.2 degrees or less, there’s a good chance that your thyroid is slightly underactive.
What about your husband? Research suggests that sperm counts are dropping throughout the industrialized world. There’s a good possibility this is coming from chemicals, especially pesticides, which mimic estrogen effects in the body. In many countries this has become an area of major concern. It’s interesting to note that, according to studies, sperm counts of organic farmers have increased, whereas farmers using pesticides have seen a decrease in theirs. Much like for women, men should refrain from using melatonin and stop drinking alcohol. If your husband takes any blood pressure or cholesterol medicine, have him talk to his doctor. Medications such as ver...

Author: Jacob Teitelbaum, MD

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