Anger Management Counseling Scottsbluff NE

By Nancy Ross-Flanigan A milestone birthday was approaching, and instead of celebrating quietly with my husband as I usually do, I wanted more festivity. When I heard that a local restaurant was throwing a Mardi Gras party, I put out the word to a bunch of pals-offering to foot the bill for everyone's tickets-and ended up with a decent number who said they were as ready for a night of fun as I w...

William Jon Michael, MD
(308) 630-1828
2 W 42nd St Ste 3200
Scottsbluff, NE
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1996
Hospital
Hospital: Box Butte Gen Hosp, Alliance, Ne; Regional West Med Ctr, Scottsbluff, Ne

Data Provided by:
Mark Richard Scanlan, MD
(308) 635-3888
2 W 42nd St Ste 3200
Scottsbluff, NE
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1991
Hospital
Hospital: Regional West Med Ctr, Scottsbluff, Ne
Group Practice: Partners IN Behavioral Health

Data Provided by:
Harbans Hans
4110 Avenue D
Scottsbluff, NE
Specialty
Psychiatry, Alzheimer's Specialist

Mr. James Holt
Umoja Counseling
(402) 805-1499
4613 N. 45 Ave
Omaha, NE
Credentials
Credentials: LCSW
Licensed in Nebraska
10 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Behavioral Problems, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Stress, Anger Management
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Interracial Families/Couples, Biracial
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mrs. Elaine L Blickenstaff
(402) 763-4707
Choices Counseling and Consulting Inc.10846 John Galt Boulevard
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Depression, Anxiety or Fears, Anger Management, Bipolar Disorder
Qualification
School: University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO)
Year of Graduation: 2001
Years In Practice: 8 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Toddlers / Preschoolers (0 to 6),Children (6 to 10),Preteens / Tweens (11 to 13),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepted Insurance Plans: Aetna

Maria Elena Zerpa, MD
704 Monument Cir
Scottsbluff, NE
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Central De Venezuela, Esc De Med "luis Razetti", Caracas
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Donald Edward Fischer, MD
(308) 632-0800
115 W Railway St # 101
Scottsbluff, NE
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 1968

Data Provided by:
William Michael
2 W 42nd St
Scottsbluff, NE
Specialty
Psychiatry, Alzheimer's Specialist

Ms. Maria Prokop
(308) 762-9018
212 Box Butte Ave Suite A
Alliance, NE
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Depression, Spiritual/Religious Concerns, Anger Management
Populations Served
Military/Veterans
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Ms. Amy Jo Murphy
(402) 835-4166
A J Counseling Services, P. C.11330 Q Street
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Child or Adolescent, Anger Management, Anxiety or Fears
Qualification
School: Grace University
Year of Graduation: 2003
Years In Practice: 7 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults
Average Cost
$100 - $160
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: APS Healthcare

Data Provided by:

Defusing Anger

Provided by: 

By Nancy Ross-Flanigan

A milestone birthday was approaching, and instead of celebrating quietly with my husband as I usually do, I wanted more festivity. When I heard that a local restaurant was throwing a Mardi Gras party, I put out the word to a bunch of pals—offering to foot the bill for everyone’s tickets—and ended up with a decent number who said they were as ready for a night of fun as I was.

As the evening neared, we emailed excitedly back and forth, mostly silly stuff about what we were planning to wear. Mallory retrieved the sequined bustier her sister had borrowed; Emily hunted in the basement for some feathered finery from New Orleans. I paid for the dinner ahead of time and splurged on glittery masks and other party paraphernalia.

By party day, the ranks had thinned a bit—a nasty bug was going around—but I still expected a table full of merry guests. When a couple of others also failed to show up at the restaurant that night, I was disappointed—and concerned. Had they also fallen ill? Was there an accident, a family emergency? The next day I found out that in fact, my absent friends’ excuses for standing me up were pretty lame: Both had just flaked out, exhausted from daytime commitments they knew they had when they’d accepted my invitation.

When I heard the news, I could feel the anger bubble up inside me, making my head throb. But what to do with it?

It’s a question to which I’ve never found a satisfactory answer. I could try to hold in my fury, but whenever I do that I end up seething, my thoughts swirling into ever-greater spirals of self-righteousness. Lashing out with a torrent of angry words didn’t really seem appropriate to the offense, either, yet the thought of meekly forgiving and forgetting made me feel like a doormat. I’ve been stuck in this conundrum for years, never sure of the best way to handle this explosive emotion.

I need a different way of dealing with anger, and it turns out that a lot of other people do, too. With road rage, desk rage, air rage, and other extreme expressions of anger on the rise, conventional wisdom about how to handle hot emotions is shifting. Psychologists used to advise expressing anger as soon as the feeling surfaced. Bottling it up only led to lingering resentment, they maintained, and all that pent-up hostility could poison personal interactions and harm your health. But now experts say that while repressing your anger altogether isn’t a good thing, unleashing it in the heat of the moment only generates more fury.

“Anger produces more anger,” says psychologist Robert Allan of Weill Medical College of Cornell University, in New York City. “Typically it gets people defensive, and they respond to the anger rather than to the intended message.” Outbursts are unhealthy, too, causing blood pressure to spike and raising the risk for all sorts of heart-related problems.

So outbursts are out, and repression has been rejected. That leaves a third path, one we’ve been hearing about ...

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