Scar Tissue Relief Salt Lake City UT

"The reality is if you've ever had an injury, you have scar tissue," says Natalie Nevins, a medical doctor and a certified yoga instructor in Hollywood, California. Scar tissue forms as the body’s natural response to trauma, such as sprains, strains, and repetitive stress injuries to muscles and joints.

Nathan Anderson Bay, MD
201 E South Temple Apt 135
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Anesthesiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Finch U Of Hs/Chicago Med Sch, North Chicago Il 60664
Graduation Year: 2002

Data Provided by:
Christopher D Yarber, DO
(801) 641-3530
379 E 600 S Apt 7
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Anesthesiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Western U Hlt Sci Col Osteo Med Of The Pacific, Pomona Ca 91766
Graduation Year: 2002

Data Provided by:
Sudha Bharatkumar Shah, MD
PO Box 95
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Anesthesiology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Bj Med Coll, Gujarat Univ, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided by:
Dr.Douglas Hill
(801) 268-7270
1200 East 3900 South
Salt Lake City, UT
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ut Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1982
Speciality
Anesthesiologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Anthony Diaz
(801) 261-4988
3838 S 700 E
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialty
Anesthesiology

Data Provided by:
Mark Miles Passey, MD
(801) 933-4951
48 W Broadway
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Anesthesiology, Pain Management
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ut Sch Of Med, Salt Lake Cty Ut 84132
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Christopher G Reveley, MD
(801) 773-3339
5 S 500 W Unit 917
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Anesthesiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Dartmouth Med, Hanover Nh 03755
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Scott Nelson Beall, MD
(765) 762-2496
1050 E South Temple
Salt Lake Cty, UT
Specialties
Anesthesiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Ben James Howard
(801) 993-1566
1050 E South Temple
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialty
Anesthesiology

Data Provided by:
Karl S Hurst-Wicker, MD
(917) 407-1956
941 E 1300 S
Salt Lake City, UT
Specialties
Anesthesiology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

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Deep-Down Pain Relief

Provided by: 

By Jennifer Lang

As soon as I got out of bed, I knew something was wrong. My left foot felt fine, but my right one hurt each time I took a step. I did a quick mental check of potential causes: a bike ride with kids—OK. A vigorous yoga class—maybe. A 30-minute jump-roping session in my lightweight, snazzy sneakers—ouch!

For the following two weeks, I winced when I walked. An orthopedist, who X-rayed my foot, discovered a bone spur and the beginnings of mild arthritis in both feet. He concluded that I’d pinched a nerve jumping rope in non-supportive shoes. Prescription: time, patience, and no more strenuous yoga.

A week later, still in pain, I went to a chiropractor. After reviewing the doctor’s report, he felt my right foot, then left, then right again. New diagnosis: scar tissue. It’s normal, he said, but because of a severely sprained ankle 13 years ago, I had a lot of it.

Hearing about everyone else’s aches, my guess is I’m not alone. Many people walk around with vague pain in their shoulders or backs thinking they’ve got tendonitis or arthritis. What if it’s not one of those catchall “itises,” but really scar tissue? And what if healing requires a more hands-on approach and some yoga-like stretching instead of an anti-inflammatory and a sling?

Moving the matrix
“The reality is if you’ve ever had an injury, you have scar tissue,” says Natalie Nevins, a medical doctor and a certified yoga instructor in Hollywood, California. Scar tissue forms as the body’s natural response to trauma, such as sprains, strains, and repetitive stress injuries to muscles and joints. It consists primarily of collagen, which is a type of connective tissue that assists healing of the damaged tissues. “We often think of it as bad, but without it our bodies would never heal,” says Nevins.

But scar tissue formation isn’t always problem-free. Unlike soft tissue—which has fibers running alongside each other in the same direction—scar tissue can form randomly, potentially causing pain and limiting function. “Think of a game of pick-up sticks where you stand the sticks upright in your hand and then gently let go, allowing them to drop any which way,” says Nevins. “That’s what scar tissue can do if you don’t help your body heal properly.” Meaning? Say you sprain your wrist. Most likely, your instinct is to immobilize it based on the RICE theory—rest, ice, compression, and elevation. But what you really need to do is keep moving. “Rest doesn’t mean immobilize,” says Nevins. “It means do what you can do—gentle, pain-free, range-of-motion, non-weight-bearing exercises—and slowly work your way up each day.” If you keep proper motion going and strengthen the surrounding area, slowly working to rehabilitate the injury and stretch the surrounding areas that are tight, scar tissue will lay down in the same pattern as the original tissue.

Easy does it

Because scar tissue takes years to form and is created any time you damage skin, tendons, ligaments, fascia, muscle...

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