Narcolepsy Specialist Sioux Falls SD

You don’t have to accept sleep deprivation and the ills that accompany it. Nor must you resort to pharmaceutical sleeping aids, which generally bring on their own set of disabling symptoms. Before you take a tranquilizer, which will invariably mask your symptoms, consider trying these seven natural remedies—they can gently and effectively help you snooze your way back to health.

Stephen Thomas Foley, MD
(605) 328-9100
2701 S Kiwanis Ave
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialties
Family Practice, Sleep Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: Mc Kennan Hospital, Sioux Falls, Sd; Sioux Valley Hospital, Sioux Falls, Sd
Group Practice: Central Plains Clinic West

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All City Pet Care South
(605) 335-4004
3508 S Minnesota Ave
Sioux Falls, SD

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All City Pet Care East
(605) 371-2100
1920 S Sycamore Ave
Sioux Falls, SD

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All City Pet Care West
(605) 361-3537
3400 S Holbrook Ave
Sioux Falls, SD

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Bruce Alden Elkins
(605) 322-5100
4928 N Cliff Ave
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialty
Occupational Medicine

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Sanford USD Medical Center Sleep Disorders Center
(605) 333-6302
1621 S. Minnesota Avenue
Sioux Falls, SD
Doctors Refferal
No
Ages Seen
all ages
Insurance
Insurance: It is the patients responsibility to contact their insurance company
Medicare: Yes
Medicaid: Yes

All City Pet Care South - ER
(605) 977-6200
3508 S Minnesota Ave
Sioux Falls, SD

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Sioux Valley Veterinary Clinic
(605) 334-0559
4600 E Arrowhead Pkwy
Sioux Falls, SD

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Richard J. Howard
(605) 334-1930
6301 S. Minnesota Avenue
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialties
Cosmetic Surgery
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Walker Alan Wynkoop, MD
(605) 331-3178
1210 W 18th St
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics, General Practice
Gender
Male
Languages
Japanese
Education
Medical School: Loyola Univ Of Chicago Stritch Sch Of Med, Maywood Il 60153
Graduation Year: 1985

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Countdown to a Good Night's Sleep

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By Herbert Ross, DC, with Keri Brenner, LAc

We spend up to a third of our lives asleep. Although some hard-driving people may view sleep as an inconvenience that curtails productivity and leisure activities, slumber is certainly no waste of time. In fact, sleep may play a more crucial role than diet or exercise in fostering optimal health.

A natural restorative, sleep offers an antidote to the damage done to our bodies during the day. It allows the body to replenish its immune system, eliminate free radicals, and ward off heart disease and mood imbalances. When sleep is disrupted—whether by lifestyle factors, insomnia, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome, jet lag, sleepwalking, night terrors, hormonal imbalance, or some other disorder—emotional and physiological health suffers.

But you don’t have to accept sleep deprivation and the ills that accompany it. Nor must you resort to pharmaceutical sleeping aids, which generally bring on their own set of disabling symptoms. Before you take a tranquilizer, which will invariably mask your symptoms, consider trying these seven natural remedies—they can gently and effectively help you snooze your way back to health.

1. Improve your diet

What you eat definitely influences the quality of your sleep. Fortunately, you have a great deal of control over these factors even though it can sometimes be hard to exercise. Here are the golden rules for a sleep-conducive diet:
• Avoid alcohol consumption or curtail it markedly.
• Avoid caffeine in all forms.
• Identify and eliminate allergenic foods. Common culprits include wheat, eggs, and chocolate, as well as milk and corn.
• Eat to boost levels of tryptophan, a building block for melatonin. To do that, eat an evening or bedtime snack consisting primarily of carbohydrates, but with a small amount of a food rich in tryptophan like turkey, chicken, eggs, dairy products, nuts and seeds, soy products, oatmeal, or bananas.
• Eat more raw vegetables and salad greens.
• Eat whole grains and high-fiber foods, and avoid sugary or processed simple carbohydrates. Whole grains contain many B vitamins, which act as natural sedatives for calming irritability and tension that may hinder deep sleep.
• Eat more protein during the day in the form of moderate amounts of lean meat, seafood, eggs, nuts, brown rice, beans, and avocados. Protein is digested more slowly and doesn’t cause an insulin spike, which may interfere with sleep.
• Eat a wide variety of foods to ensure that you are getting sufficient nutrition.
• Be aware of the fat content of foods. Incorporate healthy fats such as olive oil and flaxseed oil, which contain omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.
• Take 1 gram of niacinamide (vitamin B3) at bedtime. This is useful for those who fall sleep easily but awaken and cannot get back to sleep.
• Take 500 mg of chlorella or other algae products at bedtime, as a source of tryptophan.

2. Detoxify your body
Increasingly, researchers have identified toxicity ...

Author: Herbert Ross, DC, with Keri Brenner, LAc

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...