Heartburn Specialist Honolulu HI

Just about everyone experiences heartburn at some point in their lives, after a stop at the Rib Shack, say, or too many mochas. For most folks it's a passing problem. But roughly 60 million Americans suffer that burning sensation in their esophagus once a month, and some 15 million experience heartburn every day. They suffer from GERD-gastroesophageal reflux disorder. Along with heartburn, they...

Rodney Mitsuo Kazama, MD
(808) 526-0033
1380 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hi John A Burns Sch Of Med, Honolulu Hi 96822
Graduation Year: 1978

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Richard S Omura, MD FACS
(808) 524-1856
2541 Pauoa Rd
Honolulu, HI
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Creighton
Graduation Year: 1953

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Rodney Mitsuo Kazama
(808) 526-0033
1380 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

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Roland B Ter, MD
(808) 522-4233
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Queensland, Fac Of Med, Herston, Queensland, Australia
Graduation Year: 1991

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Kagehito Hayashi, MD
(808) 522-4233
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wa Sch Of Med, Seattle Wa 98195
Graduation Year: 1987

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Gerald Alan Hiatt
(808) 526-9575
1329 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Jerome M Walsh
(808) 522-4233
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Gastroenterology

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Mari Ikeguchi
(808) 522-4000
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Kenneth S Hong
(808) 538-9011
1301 Punchbowl St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Gastroenterology

Data Provided by:
Cynthia M Mullen, MD
(808) 526-2190
1356 Lusitana St Fl 7
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Gastroenterology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

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Cool the Fires of Heartburn

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Just about everyone experiences heartburn at some point in their lives, after a stop at the Rib Shack, say, or too many mochas. For most folks it’s a passing problem. But roughly 60 million Americans suffer that burning sensation in their esophagus once a month, and some 15 million experience heartburn every day. They suffer from GERD—gastroesophageal reflux disorder. Along with heartburn, they may also face other side effects of the disorder, including chronic respiratory infections, a dry, hacking cough, sour breath, impaired sleep, nutrient deficiencies—and eight times the risk of cancer of the esophagus.

The immediate cause, the backup of stomach acid into the esophagus, leads many sufferers to reach for the Tums—a safe, natural, alkaline remedy that neutralizes the acid and eases the discomfort, according to John Neustadt, ND, medical director of Montana Integrative Medicine in Bozeman. But Tums and other antacids don’t address the root problems behind GERD.

Surprisingly, “It’s usually too little stomach acid production and not too much that’s the problem,” he says. Two reasons: The acid breaks down food, preventing indigestion; and the acid signals the lower esophageal sphincter to close, blocking backflow. GERD medications exacerbate the problem by further suppressing acid production. Instead of taking meds, work with your doctor to determine the cause behind your low acid production (such as allergies, nutrient deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases). Complement that with a few dietary changes: Avoid mint, caffeine, and nicotine (which weaken the esophageal sphincter); eat smaller, more frequent meals; chew your food well; don’t eat on the run or while stressed; and forgo food three hours before bedtime. Meanwhile, here’s a handful of remedies that’ll take the heat off your after-dinner hours.

1. Pantry potions. To counter low stomach acid production, Neustadt suggests taking a few tablespoons of apple cider vinegar with meals. Unlike hydrochloric acid capsules, “It won’t really be a problem in terms of burning the stomach,” he says. An excellent way to decrease the burning from acid reflux, according to Neustadt, is to take one or two Emergen-C vitamin and mineral packets. These contain minerals that make the stomach more alkaline. Or, he says, drink a concoction of 1 to 2 teaspoons of plain old baking soda in a cup of water.

2. Healing herbs. Neustadt calls deglycyrrhizinated licorice “one of the most useful things I’ve seen over the counter.” It coats and soothes the esophagus—and it fights inflammation. He recommends people simply take it as directed on the container. He also recommends brewing slippery elm bark tea for similar reasons. Drinking a half cup of liquid aloe vera twice a day between meals does the trick as well (though it can cause diarrhea and is contraindicated during pregnancy).

Author: James Keough

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions

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AAOMS - American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 96th Annual Meeting, Scientific Sessions, & Exhibition
Dates: 9/8/2014 – 9/13/2014
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