Bone Health Tips Vidalia GA

Women also lose bone mass and density because of the high acidity of the typical Western diet. This forces the body to use dietary minerals—and, in their absence, minerals in the bones—to balance the body's pH level, an equilibrium that's critical for survival.

William Hayes Wilson, MD
(404) 351-2551
2001 Peachtree Rd NE
Atlanta, GA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med, Atlanta Ga 30322
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Piedmont Hosp, Atlanta, Ga
Group Practice: Piedmont Rheumatology Consltnt

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Ciela E Lopez Armstrong, MD
2500 Hospital Blvd
Roswell, GA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Central Del Caribe Sch Of Med, Bayamon Pr 00621
Graduation Year: 1996

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David Julius Zelman, MD
Marietta, GA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1976

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Sandra La Forest White, MD
(770) 431-4186
Mail Code G00904 3350 Peachtree Road
Atlanta, GA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Mt Sinai Sch Of Med Of The City Univ Of Ny, New York Ny 10029
Graduation Year: 1977

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Doyt L Conn
(404) 616-2501
80 Jesse Hill Jr Dr Se
Atlanta, GA
Specialty
Rheumatology

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Erick Bournigal, MD
(912) 267-1026
1111 Glynco Pkwy
Brunswick, GA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oh State Univ Coll Of Med, Columbus Oh 43210
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Peter Andrew Andersen, MD
Atlanta, GA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Los Angeles, Ucla Sch Of Med, Los Angeles Ca 90024
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided by:
Ezra Sharon, MD
(713) 927-3523
1541 Briarvista Way NE
Atlanta, GA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: The Hebrew Univ, Hadassah Med Sch, Jerusalem, Israel
Graduation Year: 1967

Data Provided by:
Michael Lance Smitherman, MD
11660 Alpharetta Highways
Roswell, GA
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided by:
Andres Salazar
(770) 603-3828
2400 Mount Zion Pkwy
Jonesboro, GA
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

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Building Strong Bones

Provided by: 

By James Keough

Theoretically, women should get all the nutrients they need to build and maintain strong bones from their diet, but for myriad reasons, not many do. A spate of new research suggests that most premenopausal women need supplements to ward off osteoporosis later in life. A study from the University of Michigan School of Nursing found that the gradual reduction of estrogen levels that precedes menopause can impair vitamin K’s role in binding calcium to bone. The authors say the current recommended daily intake (RDI) of 1 mg/kg/d—the amount deemed necessary to ensure proper blood clotting—may not be enough for perimenopausal women, but establishing an optimum RDI awaits further research.

Women also lose bone mass and density because of the high acidity of the typical Western diet. This forces the body to use dietary minerals—and, in their absence, minerals in the bones—to balance the body’s pH level, an equilibrium that’s critical for survival. While dietary changes can reverse this acidosis, new research from Switzerland shows that taking a daily supplement of potassium citrate can improve the bones in postmenopausal women with low bone mass. The women who received the supplement had a significant increase in bone mass density in their lumbar spine and hips compared with women who received potassium chloride supplements. The difference indicates that the alkaline nature of the potassium citrate supplement improves bone health independent of the bone-building effects of potassium alone.

Chronic inflammation, another by-product of our Western diet, weakens bones by forcing the body’s osteoclasts, the cells that degrade and reabsorb bone, into overdrive. This accelerates the loss of minerals the body socked away during its youth. In a study on mice, researchers at the University of Texas in San Antonio found that supplementing with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) put the brakes on the osteoclasts and slowed down the loss of bone (and muscle) mass. CLA, a compound formed from plant fatty acids, occurs naturally in dairy products and meat.

Dietary changes can prove difficult to make—just ask anyone trying to lose weight—but women who are concerned about osteoporosis can take a simple step toward bone health: Stop drinking colas. It doesn’t seem to matter if the sodas are diet, regular, or decaffeinated, says a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Women 60 or older who drink cola had lower bone mass than those who didn’t, and the loss became greater with each additional can. Still need that carbonated pick-me-up? Noncola soft drinks appear to be bone-friendly.

Author: James Keough

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