Bone Health Tips Tulsa OK

Women also lose bone mass and density because of the high acidity of the typical Western diet. This forces the body to use dietary minerals—and, in their absence, minerals in the bones—to balance the body's pH level, an equilibrium that's critical for survival.

Ellen Irene Zanetakis, MD
(918) 748-8024
2424 E 21st St Ste 500
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Northeastern Oh Univs Coll Of Med, Rootstown Oh 44272
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Hillcrest Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok; St John Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok
Group Practice: Oklahoma Center-Arthritis Thrp

Data Provided by:
William Lawrence Surbeck, MD
(918) 748-7540
1919 S Wheeling Ave Ste 706
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1988
Hospital
Hospital: St John Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok
Group Practice: Pssi

Data Provided by:
Dr.Ellen Zanetakis
(918) 748-8024
1430 Terrace Drive
Tulsa, OK
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Northeastern Oh Univs Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1982
Speciality
Rheumatologist
General Information
Hospital: Hillcrest Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.9, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

Data Provided by:
James McKay
(918) 748-8024
1430 Terrace Dr
Tulsa, OK
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
William Surbeck
(918) 748-7540
1919 S Wheeling Ave
Tulsa, OK
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
James Donald Mc Kay, DO
2424 E 21st St Ste 500
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Kirksville Coll Of Osteo Med, Kirksville Mo 63501
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided by:
Ellen Zanetakis
(918) 748-8024
1430 Terrace Dr
Tulsa, OK
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Alan Martin
(918) 748-7540
1919 S Wheeling Ave
Tulsa, OK
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Alan Lee Martin, MD
(918) 748-7540
1919 S Wheeling Ave Ste 706
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1989
Hospital
Hospital: St John Med Ctr, Tulsa, Ok; St Francis Hospital, Tulsa, Ok
Group Practice: Pssi

Data Provided by:
Douglas William White, MD
(918) 492-3636
5020 E 68th St
Tulsa, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med, Iowa City Ia 52242
Graduation Year: 2000

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Building Strong Bones

Provided by: 

By James Keough

Theoretically, women should get all the nutrients they need to build and maintain strong bones from their diet, but for myriad reasons, not many do. A spate of new research suggests that most premenopausal women need supplements to ward off osteoporosis later in life. A study from the University of Michigan School of Nursing found that the gradual reduction of estrogen levels that precedes menopause can impair vitamin K’s role in binding calcium to bone. The authors say the current recommended daily intake (RDI) of 1 mg/kg/d—the amount deemed necessary to ensure proper blood clotting—may not be enough for perimenopausal women, but establishing an optimum RDI awaits further research.

Women also lose bone mass and density because of the high acidity of the typical Western diet. This forces the body to use dietary minerals—and, in their absence, minerals in the bones—to balance the body’s pH level, an equilibrium that’s critical for survival. While dietary changes can reverse this acidosis, new research from Switzerland shows that taking a daily supplement of potassium citrate can improve the bones in postmenopausal women with low bone mass. The women who received the supplement had a significant increase in bone mass density in their lumbar spine and hips compared with women who received potassium chloride supplements. The difference indicates that the alkaline nature of the potassium citrate supplement improves bone health independent of the bone-building effects of potassium alone.

Chronic inflammation, another by-product of our Western diet, weakens bones by forcing the body’s osteoclasts, the cells that degrade and reabsorb bone, into overdrive. This accelerates the loss of minerals the body socked away during its youth. In a study on mice, researchers at the University of Texas in San Antonio found that supplementing with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) put the brakes on the osteoclasts and slowed down the loss of bone (and muscle) mass. CLA, a compound formed from plant fatty acids, occurs naturally in dairy products and meat.

Dietary changes can prove difficult to make—just ask anyone trying to lose weight—but women who are concerned about osteoporosis can take a simple step toward bone health: Stop drinking colas. It doesn’t seem to matter if the sodas are diet, regular, or decaffeinated, says a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Women 60 or older who drink cola had lower bone mass than those who didn’t, and the loss became greater with each additional can. Still need that carbonated pick-me-up? Noncola soft drinks appear to be bone-friendly.

Author: James Keough

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