Breast Protection Arverne NY

Like most American women, I went on to take part in the periodic rituals of that peculiar sisterhood, showing up at the clinic once every year or so for my mammogram. Though I had no family history of breast cancer, my doctors and widespread public health messages had convinced me that this regular trek was my best protection against the life'threatening disease.

Farida P Chaudhri MD
(718) 358-3057
146-01 45th Ave
Flushing, NY
Specialties
Oncology

Data Provided by:
Kee Y Shum MD
(212) 941-0660
254 Canal St
New York, NY
Specialties
Oncology

Data Provided by:
Michael Schuster
(212) 746-2119
525 East 68th Street
New York, NY
Specialties
Oncology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


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Richard G Stock MD
(212) 241-7502
1184 5th Ave
New York, NY
Specialties
Oncology

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Steven Edward Vogl
(718) 519-7774
2220 Tiemann Ave
Bronx, NY
Business
Steven Edward Vogl MD
Specialties
Oncology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
meena Ahluwalia
(718) 250-6960
121 dekalb Ave
brooklyn, NY
Specialties
Oncology, Hematology Medical Oncology
Doctor Information
Residency Training: Wyckoff Heights medical center

Additional Information
Member Organizations: ASCO ASH AMA
Awards: patient's choice award 2008,2009


Data Provided by:
Herbert Gretz
(212) 427-9898
525 E 68Th St
New York, NY
Specialties
Oncology

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Ron Bakal
(212) 679-6464
461 Park Avenue South
New York, NY
Business
Ron Bakal MD PC
Specialties
Urology, ONCOLOGY,KIDNEY STONES, INFERTILITY, INCONTINENCE, MINIMALLY INVASIVE PROCEDURES FOR BPH,PROSTATE CANCER,HPV AND OTHER STD TREATMENT.
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: All insurances ie: CIGNA, GHI, OXFORD, MEDICARE, HIP, HEALTHFIRST, FIRSTHEALTH. ATLANTIS, WELLCARE, BLUE CROSS, HORIZON, MAGNACARE, 1199, AMERICHOICE, AETNA, ELDERPLAN, HEALTHNET, MULTIPLAN,
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: Yes

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Beth Israel Medical Center
Residency Training: MONTEFIORE/ALBERT EINSTEIN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
Medical School: UMDNJ-NEW JERSEY MEDICAL SCHOOL NEWARK, 1995
Additional Information
Languages Spoken: English,Hebrew,Spanish,Russian

Data Provided by:
Louis Juden Reed
(718) 863-8465
1180 Morris Park Ave
Bronx, NY
Business
Louis Juden Reed MD
Specialties
Oncology
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided by:
Roy A Debeer
(718) 471-7010
407 Beach 20th St
Far Rockaway, NY
Specialty
Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology

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Breast Protection

Provided by: 

By Sally Lehrman

Shortly after I turned 40, my doctor sent me off for a screening mammogram—my first since a lump (benign, fortunately) had appeared two decades earlier. As I entered the floral-wallpapered waiting room, I felt welcomed into a special sorority. Women lounged in comfy chairs, reading magazines, in varying stages of undress. I pulled on a thin gown, and one kind older woman, noticing my goosebumps, advised me to use two, one facing forward and one back, for warmth. When I left, the receptionist handed me a single pink rose.

Like most American women, I went on to take part in the periodic rituals of that peculiar sisterhood, showing up at the clinic once every year or so for my mammogram. Though I had no family history of breast cancer, my doctors and widespread public health messages had convinced me that this regular trek was my best protection against the life-threatening disease.

Apparently many other women feel the same way: In a survey published in 2004, nearly 90 percent of women said they got screening mammograms (those given to healthy women with no sign of the disease), and most felt it would be irresponsible for a midlife woman not to.

But unbeknownst to most of us, specialists passionately disagree on the value of mammographic screening, the current gold standard for finding breast cancer. Indeed, an increasingly vocal group of oncologists and radiologists believe these purportedly lifesaving tests aren’t as helpful as we’ve been led to think, and that they may even do quite a bit of harm, especially in younger women.

“You can only stick your head in the sand for so long,” says Cornelia J. Baines, a public health researcher at the University of Toronto who conducted a major study of mammography. “I think mammograms will be a forgotten technology before long.”

Can she really be talking about screening mammography? The technology that the American Cancer Society, the American Medical Association, and just about any doctor you talk to say gives us our best shot at catching breast cancer before it kills us?

Actually, yes. And Baines is no crackpot. In one study, she and her colleagues followed nearly 90,000 women in their 40s and 50s randomly assigned to get mammography and breast exams or breast exams alone. They found that while screening mammography helped detect more and smaller cancers, it did not reduce death rates at all. Worse yet, in a trend that didn’t reach statistical significance but was still worrisome, women in their 40s had higher death rates from breast cancer when they did get screened.

That sounds like a through-the-looking-glass conclusion, given the way we’re accustomed to thinking about mammography. But when a highly regarded group of health care analysts at the Cochrane Centre in Copenhagen sat down to review the seven biggest and best studies on mammography screening, they concluded that only two were solidly designed—one of which was Baines’s study. The Cochrane group’s conclusion—h...

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