Supplements for Depression Port Angeles WA

Like most psychiatrists would, Cass asked Jones how she was feeling. But that was just the beginning. Jones soon found herself detailing what she ate for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and in between. She was asked to describe her energy and mood swings throughout the day, her sleep patterns, and any worrisome symptom she could think of.

Melody E Williams
(360) 797-5914
P.O. Box 2306
Port Angeles, WA
Specialties
Relationship Issues, Depression, Child or Adolescent
Qualification
Years In Practice: 30+ Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: All
Age: Children (6 to 10),Adolescents / Teenagers (14 to 19),Adults,Elders (65+)
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: No
Accepted Insurance Plans: APS Healthcare

Richard P. Jessel
(509) 427-5001
120 NW Jordan Road
Stevenson, WA
Services
Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Individual Psychotherapy, Psychological Assessment, Personality Disorder (e.g., borderline, antisocial)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: U Portland
Credentialed Since: 1977-05-31

Data Provided by:
Craig A. Lammers
(509) 838-1701
W 801 5th, Ste 325
Spokane, WA
Services
Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Couples Psychotherapy, Stress Management or Pain Management
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Fuller Theological Seminary
Credentialed Since: 1986-06-03

Data Provided by:
Jay M. Toews
(509) 534-3683
901 E 2nd Ave, Ste 204
Spokane, WA
Services
Disability Determination or Worker Compensation Evaluation, Stress Management or Pain Management, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Psychological Assessment
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Wash St U
Credentialed Since: 1975-08-18

Data Provided by:
Ms. Sandra Mathews
Sandra Mathews, MSW
(425) 462-7889
1450 114th Ave SE Suite 100
Bellevue, WA
Credentials
Credentials: LICSW
Licensed in Washington
17 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Interpersonal Relationships, Trauma/PTSD
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Mary Kathryn Hamilton
(253) 566-2851
4041 Ruston Way
Tacoma, WA
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Gender Issues (MenÆs/WomenÆs Issues), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Missouri - Columbia
Credentialed Since: 1993-08-12

Data Provided by:
Ellen L. Beauchamp
(425) 456-0145
Bellefield Office Park
Bellevue, WA
Services
Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Couples Psychotherapy, Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Problem Related to Abuse or Neglect (e.g., domestic violence, child abuse)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: United States International University
Credentialed Since: 1986-11-07

Data Provided by:
Karl O. Moe
(253) 968-5189
10802 83rd Ave SW
Lakewood, WA
Services
Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Stress Management or Pain Management, Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder, Disability Determination or Worker Compensation Evaluation, Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Arizona State University
Credentialed Since: 1997-06-11

Data Provided by:
Ms. Cosette Rae
Heavensfield Behavioral Health
(425) 417-0406
PO Box 490
Fall City, WA
Credentials
Credentials: LSWAIC
Licensed in Washington
5 Years of Experience
Problems Served
Addictions/Substance, Anxiety/Panic Disorders, Child Abuse and Neglect, Couple or Marital Issues, Depression, Dissociative Disorders, Domestic Violence, Family Dysfunction, Interpersonal Relationships, Parenting Issues, Self Abuse, Sexual Abuse/Rape, Spiri
Populations Served
Children of Divorce, Military/Veterans, Step Families
Membership Organizations
HelpPro.com
Age Groups Served
Children (6-12), Adolescents (13-17), Young Adults (18-25), Adults (26-59)

Data Provided by:
Samuel R. Bradley
(360) 357-4225
1021 Legion Way
Olympia, WA
Services
Couples Psychotherapy, Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder), Anxiety Disorder (e.g., generalized anxiety, phobia, panic or obsessive-compulsive disorder), Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: U Wash
Credentialed Since: 1977-11-30

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Brain Food: The Natural Cure for Depression

Provided by: 

By Karin Evans

By the time she turned 44, Rebecca Jones∗ felt like she was falling apart. “Some times I was plagued by a crushing fatigue, I was moody, and just moving through my day was a major chore,” she says. “I wasn’t sleeping well, had lots of headaches and a sluggish libido, and my memory was often foggy.” Jones chalked up some of her woes to perimenopause, so she followed some of the standard advice for that, like cutting out caffeine, for instance. But she still felt wobbly and low.

A clinical psychologist by profession, Jones recognized that some of her symptoms pointed to depression. She figured she needed some serious attention, so she made an appointment with Los Angeles psychiatrist Hyla Cass.

Like most psychiatrists would, Cass asked Jones how she was feeling. But that was just the beginning. Jones soon found herself detailing what she ate for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and in between. She was asked to describe her energy and mood swings throughout the day, her sleep patterns, and any worrisome symptom she could think of.

Cass sent Jones for a battery of tests—blood tests that went far beyond the usual screenings—to look for anemia, blood sugar levels, and thyroid function, factors widely believed to contribute to depression. Cass also tested Jones for candida and checked her chromium, magnesium, and estrogen levels, as well as her adrenal function and her risk for toxic overload, among other things.

After analyzing the results, Cass opted not to recommend antidepressants. Instead, she told Jones to start taking supplements, including chromium, which evens out blood sugar levels, and magnesium, vital for brainpower. She gave her a specific supplement for candida, plus a menopause support formula, and another remedy to help restore adrenal function.

“Within the first week of following her program, I felt much better,” says Jones. After three weeks she went back for more tests, and Cass prescribed additional supplements. “It’s still unbelievable to me,” says Jones, “but after six weeks, my mood swings and anxiety disappeared completely.” These days, she continues to take supplements to control her depression and boost her energy, and has yet to take a single antidepressant.

For those accustomed to the notion that therapy means talking through problems and getting a prescription for antidepressants, this may seem an unusual approach. But Cass, an expert in nutritional medicine and an assistant clinical professor at UCLA, long ago became convinced that no form of psychotherapy can be fully effective if the brain isn’t functioning properly. And to do that the brain needs optimal nourishment, something she says is increasingly hard to come by in the typical American diet. “Depressed, tired, overweight women are often told they need Prozac,” Cass says, “when in fact all they really need to get their brains and bodies on track is a steady supply of real food.”

She recommends that her patients drink lots of water a...

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