Pathologist Irvington NJ

Science now indicates that freeze'dried berries, specifically black raspberries, inhibit cancer development by restoring hundreds of cancer-altered genes to their normal state. Read on to find more information.

Cyril A D'Cruz
(973) 926-3898
201 Lyons Ave
Newark, NJ
Specialty
Pathology

Data Provided by:
Panayot Panayotov, MD
(973) 926-8556
201 Lyons Ave
Newark, NJ
Specialties
Pathology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Sofia Med Academy, Fac Of Med, Sofia, Bulgaria
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Ludmilla Olesnicky
(973) 926-7579
201 Lyons Ave
Newark, NJ
Specialty
Pathology

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Fang Qian
(973) 926-7037
201 Lyons Ave
Newark, NJ
Specialty
Pathology

Data Provided by:
Andre Jean Talleyrand, MD
(973) 763-3056
234 Conway Ct
South Orange, NJ
Specialties
Anatomic And Clinical Pathology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ D'Etat D'Haiti, Esc De Med Et De Pharmacie, Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
Graduation Year: 1965
Hospital
Hospital: Newark Beth Israel Med Center, Newark, Nj
Group Practice: Newark Beth Israel Medical Ctr

Data Provided by:
Fang Qian, MD
(973) 926-7037
201 Lyons Ave
Newark, NJ
Specialties
Anatomic And Clinical Pathology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Beijing Med Univ, Beijing, Beijing, China
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Panayot Panayotov
(973) 926-7582
201 Lyons Ave
Newark, NJ
Specialty
Pathology

Data Provided by:
Leonard Ezrow, MD
46 Sagamore Rd
Maplewood, NJ
Specialties
Anatomic And Clinical Pathology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Finch U Of Hs/Chicago Med Sch, North Chicago Il 60664
Graduation Year: 1958

Data Provided by:
Seena C Aisner, MD
150 Bergen St # E155
Newark, NJ
Specialties
Pathology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Dorothy Carol Moore, MD
(973) 972-4619
185 S Orange Ave
Newark, NJ
Specialties
Anatomic And Clinical Pathology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Umdnj-New Jersey Med Sch, Newark Nj 07103
Graduation Year: 1978

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Better Berries to Fight Cancer

Provided by: 

By Lindsay Wilson

The next time you toss a handful of berries into your morning smoothie, reach for freeze-dried instead of fresh or frozen. Science now indicates that freeze-dried berries, specifically black raspberries, inhibit cancer development by restoring hundreds of cancer-altered genes to their normal state.

“There are certain genes that play a role in the development of cancer, and while most cancer treatments only target one gene at a time, the berries have a ‘genome-wide’ effect, meaning they target many cancer-causing genes at once,” says lead researcher Gary D. Stoner, professor of pathology, human nutrition, and medicine at Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Berries are about 90 percent water and freeze-drying them removes the water while leaving the structure intact. This concentrates the cancer-preventive compounds—vitamins, minerals, phenols, and phytosterols—about 10 times, explains Stoner. He adds that fresh and frozen berries are probably protective as well, but we’d have to eat a lot more of them to get the same benefits. Also, keep in mind that some nutrients are lost when fruit is heated or cooked, so it’s best to eat your berries (freeze-dried or fresh) just as they are.

We like: Just Tomatoes, Etc.’s variety of organic dried berries, including Organic Just Raspberries ($5.50, 1.5 oz tub; justtomatoes.com ), or Wilderness Family Naturals freeze-dried organic raspberries in either whole or powdered form. ($22.45 to $18.50, 8 oz whole or powdered; wildernessfamilynaturals.com ). —LW

Author: Lindsay Wilson

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