Breast Cancer Information Park Hills MO

To get B vitamins in foods, try fortified breakfast cereals, oranges, and orange juice. For folate, look for leafy greens like spinach, dry beans and peas, and fortified breads, pasta, and cereal. Oranges and their juice also contain folate.

Rainer Karl Brachmann, MD
1 Childrens Pl Fl 1
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ, Fak Med, Munchen, Germany (407-16 Pr 1/71)
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
John Mac Dowell Sheldon, MD
(252) 430-6683
36 Doctors Park
Cape Girardeau, MO
Specialties
Radiology, Radiation Oncology, Medical Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided by:
Shabbir H Safdar
(314) 290-7555
4921 Parkview Pl
Saint Louis, MO
Specialty
Hematology, Hematology / Oncology, Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
William John Moriconi
(314) 842-6472
12700 Southfork Rd
Saint Louis, MO
Specialty
Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Irving E LaFrancis
(417) 782-7722
2727 Mcclelland Blvd
Joplin, MO
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Gordon W Philpott, MD
(314) 721-7605
7345 Westmoreland Dr
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Barry Michael Driver, MD
(417) 887-8605
4688 S Winsor Dr
Battlefield, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ky Coll Of Med, Lexington Ky 40536
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Kristen Britton, DO
Kansas City, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Umdnj-Sch Of Osteo Med, Stratford Nj 08084
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided by:
Sakuntala S Dutta, MD
(314) 577-8025
3635 Vista Ave
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Guntur Med Coll, Univ Of Hlth Sci, Guntur, Ap, India
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided by:
James Russell Allen, MD
(573) 874-7800
1131 E Lakewood St
Springfield, MO
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mo, Columbia Sch Of Med, Columbia Mo 65212
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

'B' is for Breast

Provided by: 

Good news on the breast cancer prevention front has been relatively scarce. But a new study suggests that some key vitamins may have real power to prevent the disease.Looking at ten years of data, researchers at Harvard University compared 712 women who developed breast cancer with 712 who remained cancer-free.

Among premenopausal women, those who had diets high in vitamin B-12 reduced their breast cancer risk by an impressive 63 percent. Postmenopausal women didn’t see much of a benefit from B-12, but those who got a lot of B-6 reduced their risk by 34 percent. Folate was another effective cancer-fighter in the study, specifically for women who also drank about 15 grams, or one glass, of an alcoholic beverage a day. For this group, the folate seemed to blunt the moderately elevated cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption. (Its protective effects were similar in pre- and postmenopausal women.)The women in the study got their vitamins from a combination of supplements and foods, and you may need to do the same to match the amounts they took in: 3 milligrams of B-6, 8 micrograms of B-12, and 423 mcg of folate per day. To get B vitamins in foods, try fortified breakfast cereals, oranges, and orange juice. For folate, look for leafy greens like spinach, dry beans and peas, and fortified breads, pasta, and cereal. Oranges and their juice also contain folate. So if you’re sold on drinking something alcoholic with dinner, your best bet may be a nice mimosa.

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...