Dementia Specialist Joplin MO

With the incidence of Alzheimer’s and dementia on the rise—in 2005 a panel of experts suggested cases worldwide would double every 20 years from the roughly 25 million cases then diagnosed—doctors and the general public alike would welcome a way to predict the likelihood of contracting the condition.

William Joseph Klontz
(417) 781-7337
1905 W 32nd St
Joplin, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry, Neuropsychiatry

Data Provided by:
Satwant Tandon
(417) 781-2727
2727 Mc Clelland Blvd
Joplin, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Tamon Berber Paige
(417) 781-7337
1905 W 32nd St
Joplin, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Coleman Family Eyecare Center
(417) 782-8150
2203 E 32nd St
Joplin, MO
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided by:
Steven Goad
(417) 347-7530
530 E 34th St
Joplin, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Charles Leon Graves
(417) 347-7550
530 E 34th St
Joplin, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry, Child Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Steven Kory
(417) 659-8845
1002 Mcintosh Circle
Joplin, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Healing the Family Center Inc
(417) 624-8333
2914 E 32nd St
Joplin, MO
Industry
Mental Health Professional, Psychologist

Data Provided by:
Thompson Barbara Longan
(417) 439-2717
2431 S Range Line Rd
Joplin, MO
Industry
Mental Health Professional, Psychologist

Data Provided by:
James Orlando
(417) 781-7337
1905 W 32nd St
Joplin, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry

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Assessing Dementia Risk

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By James Keough

With the incidence of Alzheimer’s and dementia on the rise—in 2005 a panel of experts suggested cases worldwide would double every 20 years from the roughly 25 million cases then diagnosed—doctors and the general public alike would welcome a way to predict the likelihood of contracting the condition.

Recently scientists at the Aging Research Center in Stockholm, Sweden, developed a risk-factor score based on the study of 1,409 subjects whom they had first examined at around 50 years of age and then again roughly 20 years later. They found that high age, blood cholesterol, hypertension, obesity, and low education levels (less than 10 years) significantly predicted future dementia. The risk-factor scores ranged from zero to 15; middle-aged subjects with a score of 12 to 15 faced a 16.4 percent risk of dementia.

While the researchers stress the need for further refinement and validation of their methods, the high level of predictability in the risk-factor score highlights the importance of lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, staying fit, and keeping mentally active in middle age and beyond. With no cure for dementia or Alzheimer’s in sight, prevention remains the only available option for achieving a clearheaded old age.

Author: James Keough

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