Panic Attack Specialist Casper WY

Anyone can suffer an isolated panic attack, especially during times of great stress. But if you experience them frequently—several times a month or regularly over longer periods—then you have what’s called “panic disorder.” Thankfully, in most cases, you can manage both varieties without resorting to long'term drug therapy.

Bruce Alan Kahn, MD
(307) 265-1190
300 S Wolcott St Ste 235
Casper, WY
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oh State Univ Coll Of Med, Columbus Oh 43210
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
Robert F Green, MD
(812) 868-0069
1233 E 2nd St
Casper, WY
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1952

Data Provided by:
Mark D Vuolo, MD
(307) 266-6244
300 S Wolcott St Ste 330
Casper, WY
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided by:
Larry D Plemmons, DO
(307) 237-1702
2417 E 15th St
Casper, WY
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Ok State Univ, Coll Of Osteo Med, Tulsa, Ok 74107
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Stephen Loyd Brown, MD
(307) 234-3638
2417 E 15th St
Casper, WY
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Southern Ca Sch Of Med, Los Angeles Ca 90033
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Wyoming Med Ctr, Casper, Wy; St Johns Hospital, Jackson, Wy; Wyoming Behavioral Inst, Casper, Wy

Data Provided by:
Dr.Arlene Viray
(307) 235-2552
111 W 2nd St # 613
Casper, WY
Gender
F
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Santo Tomas, Fac Of Med And Surg, Manila
Year of Graduation: 1988
Speciality
Psychiatrist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Dr.Mark Vuolo
(307) 266-6244
300 S Wolcott St # 330
Casper, WY
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1981
Speciality
Psychiatrist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Arlene P Viray, MD
(307) 235-2552
300 S Wolcott St
Casper, WY
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Santo Tomas, Fac Of Med And Surg, Manila, Philippines
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
Timothy Bartlett Hudson, MD
(307) 237-1702
3841 E 15th St Apt 629
Casper, WY
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Donald Jay Ross, MD
(206) 282-3177
11150 E Henrie Roadway
Evansville, WY
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Sch At San Antonio, San Antonio Tx 78284
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided by:
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Ask the Doctor—Panic Attacks

Provided by: 

Q. I think I’m having panic attacks, but I don’t want to take antianxiety drugs. I’ve heard bad things about them. Is there anything natural I can do?

A. If you are having a panic attack, you typically experience rapid heart rate, shortness of breath, sweating, trembling, tightness in the throat, dizziness, and nausea. If that sounds like your experience, I can at least assuage your fears a bit: Panic attacks can feel scary—like you’re having a heart attack—but they won’t kill you. In fact, most pass within five to 10 minutes and rarely last longer than 20 to 30 minutes.

Anyone can suffer an isolated panic attack, especially during times of great stress. But if you experience them frequently—several times a month or regularly over longer periods—then you have what’s called “panic disorder.” Thankfully, in most cases, you can manage both varieties without resorting to long-term drug therapy.

Conventional doctors and psychiatrists often prescribe antianxiety drugs called benzodiazepines like Xanax and Klonopin as well as antidepressants like Prozac and Paxil to treat panic attacks. But antidepressants have unpleasant side effects, and both types of drugs, particularly the benzos, may produce severe withdrawal symptoms, including (ironically) extreme anxiety. These drugs should only be used as a short-term treatment or as a last resort—and should always be coupled with an integrative program to address the root physical and psychological causes of panic so you can overcome them for good.

Understanding panic
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) helps you recognize the patterns of thought and the situations that trigger your fear and panic. CBT trains you to take note of what’s going on around you and what thoughts are running through your mind right before you experience an attack. Once you can recognize these patterns, you can change them. Say you lived through a terrible tornado that destroyed your neighborhood, and now every time a storm approaches, your mind becomes overwhelmed with fear and your thoughts begin to spiral out of control. CBT shows you how to recognize these destructive thought patterns and teaches you to switch to healthier ones (I lived through this before; I’ll be fine again. I know how to protect myself. I’m a strong person). One of the best ways to take control of a panic attack: Control your breathing. When you feel yourself beginning to panic, focus on making each breath slow and deep. When we’re scared and our sympathetic nervous system kicks in to adrenalin-pumping fight-or-flight mode, our breathing becomes shallow and quick. By slowing down the breath, you activate the parasympathetic nervous system, which sends calming signals to the brain.

The mind-body connection
Relaxing the body has a profound effect on the nervous system. You can accomplish this with a number of different relaxation techniques including progressive muscular relaxation (tensing and releasing discrete muscle groups in the body beginnin...

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