Kidney Stone Surgery Honolulu HI

I’ve had kidney stones a couple of times in the past few years. My doctor says they come from calcium oxalate and that I should drink more water. Is there anything else I should consider? If you’ve had any type of kidney stone more than once, I would put you in the category of a recurrent kidney- stone former. Thus, your chances of having a repeat episode are high. You’re not alone. More than 500,000 Americans per year suffer from kidney stones.

Richard Ivan Tsou
(808) 537-6968
1329 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Robert G Carlile
(808) 523-9400
1380 Lusitana St #1004
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Wm Jos Yarbrough, MD
(808) 522-5055
1329 Lusitana St Ste 602
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1968

Data Provided by:
Dr.David C. Wei
(808) 522-4301
550 S Beretania St # 503
Honolulu, HI
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Southern Ca Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1993
Speciality
Urologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Stephen Kwan bunn Chinn
(808) 522-3869
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Ulrich Stams
(808) 522-5055
1329 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
William Joseph Yarbrough
(808) 522-5055
1329 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Felecia Froe
(808) 522-5055
1329 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Douglas G LaTtimer
(808) 537-5445
1329 Lusitana St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Urology

Data Provided by:
Garry Bergwyn Peers, MD
(808) 522-5055
1329 Lusitana St Ste 602
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Urology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Ask the Doctor—Kidney Stones—Healthy Chocolate—Coenzyme Q-10 before Surgery

Provided by: 

By Dan Lukaczer, ND

Q I’ve had kidney stones a couple of times in the past few years. My doctor says they come from calcium oxalate and that I should drink more water. Is there anything else I should consider?

A If you’ve had any type of kidney stone more than once, I would put you in the category of a recurrent kidney- stone former. Thus, your chances of having a repeat episode are high. You’re not alone. More than 500,000 Americans per year suffer from kidney stones. For a man, the chance of developing a stone is one in 10 over the course of his life. For a woman, the chance is somewhat less.

You mention your kidney stones are the calcium-oxalate variety—the most common stone by far (other types are struvite, uric acid and cystine). Studies show the creation of these stones is related to diet, particularly to eating oxalates. There are a number of foods that contain natural oxalates, with the highest amounts found in spinach. Rhubarb, beets, nuts, chocolate, tea, wheat bran and strawberries also have oxalates, and all should be limited in the diet when this type of kidney stone is a problem.

Additionally, it is important to increase the solubility of oxalates in the urine so they don’t crystallize and form stones. As your doctor suggested, you should make a habit of drinking plenty of water each day so you stay well hydrated. A rule of thumb is to drink at least eight glasses per day. There are also specific nutrients that appear to help, with magnesium, potassium and B6 leading the list. A recent study that analyzed chronic stone formers who took approximately 500 mg of magnesium oxide and 5 g of potassium-sodium citrate for one week found that oxalate crystals in the urine—a warning sign of potential stone formation—decreased by two thirds.

Lastly, the old rumor that it’s important to keep calcium low in the diet has been proven incorrect. In fact, just the opposite is true: research shows that increasing dietary calcium can decrease the incidence of calcium oxalate stones in recurrent stone formers, in part, at least, by binding oxalates from food.

Q I keep hearing chocolate is good for you. I want to believe this, but is it true?

A My answer is an unequivocal yes and no. The cocoa found in chocolate has numerous health benefits (the darker the chocolate, the better). But be warned—it’s only the cocoa, not all the sugar and fat that comes packaged with it, that has health advantages.

Cocoa comes from the cocoa bean, grown on the cocoa tree (Theobroma cacao). The beans have a variety of active phytochemicals that demonstrate healthy effects. Some of the more important are polyphenols, compounds best known for their antioxidant properties. In the most recent study I’ve seen published, a small group of healthy volunteers who ate 100 g of dark chocolate, containing approximately 500 mg polyphenols, were compared to those who ate 100 g of white chocolate, which contains no polyphenols. (White chocolate is really not “chocola...

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...