Cataracts Surgery Boise ID

As light passes through the lens of the eye, proteins in the lens are unavoidably subjected to damage by free radicals. These damaged proteins change from crystal clear to cloudy and over time can create dark regions in the lens known as cataracts. Read on to find more information.

Mark Edward Hollingshead, MD
(208) 336-8700
360 E Mallard Dr Ste 110
Boise, ID
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Irvine, Ca Coll Of Med, Irvine Ca 92717
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Dr.James P Tweeten
(208) 373-1200
999 N Curtis Rd # 205
Boise, ID
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1985
Speciality
Ophthalmologist
General Information
Hospital: Mc Call Mem Hosp, McCall, Id
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Leo Steven Harf, MD
(208) 373-1200
999 N Curtis Rd Ste 205
Boise, ID
Specialties
Ophthalmology, General Practice
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mt Sinai Sch Of Med Of The City Univ Of Ny, New York Ny 10029
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: St Alphonsus Reg Med Ctr, Boise, Id
Group Practice: Intermountain Eye Clinic

Data Provided by:
Mark J Boerner, MD
Boise, ID
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Texas - San Antonio
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided by:
James Paul Tweeten, MD
(208) 373-1200
999 N Curtis Rd Ste 205
Boise, ID
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med, Denver Co 80262
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Mc Call Mem Hosp, McCall, Id; St Lukes Reg Medctr, Boise, Id; St Alphonsus Reg Med Ctr, Boise, Id
Group Practice: Intermountain Eye Clinic

Data Provided by:
Jon Robert Fishburn, MD
(208) 373-1200
999 N Curtis Rd Ste 205
Boise, ID
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Languages
German
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nv Sch Of Med, Reno Nv 89557
Graduation Year: 1991
Hospital
Hospital: St Lukes Reg Medctr, Boise, Id; St Alphonsus Reg Med Ctr, Boise, Id
Group Practice: Intermountain Eye Clinic

Data Provided by:
James Richard Swartley, MD
(208) 342-2706
222 N 2nd St Ste 215
Boise, ID
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1970
Hospital
Hospital: St Alphonsus Reg Med Ctr, Boise, Id
Group Practice: Intermountain Eye Clinic

Data Provided by:
Jeffrey Kent Gregory, MD
999 N Curtis Rd
Boise, ID
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided by:
Mark Duane Borup, MD
(208) 373-1200
999 N Curtis Rd Ste 205
Boise, ID
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ut Sch Of Med, Salt Lake Cty Ut 84132
Graduation Year: 1988
Hospital
Hospital: St Alphonsus Reg Med Ctr, Boise, Id
Group Practice: Intermountain Eye Clinic

Data Provided by:
Gregory Joseph Kent, MD
(208) 367-3302
901 N Curtis Rd Ste 302
Boise, ID
Specialties
Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Temple Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19140
Graduation Year: 1986
Hospital
Hospital: St Alphonsus Reg Med Ctr, Boise, Id
Group Practice: Eye Assoc

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Ask the Doctor—Are There Any Nutritional Ways to Prevent Cataracts?

Provided by: 

By Terry Grossman, MD,

Q Are there any nutritional ways to prevent cataracts?

As light passes through the lens of the eye, proteins in the lens are unavoidably subjected to damage by free radicals. These damaged proteins change from crystal clear to cloudy and over time can create dark regions in the lens known as cataracts.

The body is able to prevent free-radical damage by transforming the toxic free radicals into harmless compounds through the use of three built-in antioxidant enzymes: catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, all of which normally are found within the lens itself. However, a small percentage still escapes neutralization and can lead to lens damage and cataract formation.

In addition to the antioxidant enzymes, the body utilizes dietary vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients as another line of defense to neutralize free-radical damage. Italian researchers established an association between diet and cataract risk 40 years ago when they found that people who consumed higher amounts of meat, cheese, cruciferous vegetables (like broccoli, kale, and cauliflower), spinach, tomatoes, peppers, citrus fruit, and melon needed cataract surgery less often. Increased risk occurred among people who consumed higher amounts of butter, total fat, and salt. They also found that using olive oil and eating spinach appeared to protect against cataract formation, while eating carrots did not.

Several more recent studies have looked at the relationship between nutritional supplementation and cataract risk. The most notable are highlighted below.

• The Lens Opacities Case-Control Study in 1991 followed 1,380 patients and found that “regular use of multi-vitamin supplements decreased risk” of cataract formation. Individual nutrients such as vitamins B1, B2, B3, C, and E; carotene; and iron reduced risk individually as did supplemental combinations of vitamins C and E and carotene.

• The Beaver Dam Eye Study from Wisconsin followed 1,354 patients from 1988 to 1995. Antioxidant intake was determined from a food questionnaire. People who consumed the highest amount of the bioflavonoid lutein—found in green, leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale as well as yellow foods such as squash and egg yolks—had 50 percent fewer cataracts compared with people who consumed the least lutein.

• The US Male Health Professionals’ Study followed 36,644 men between 45 and 75 years of age beginning in 1986 and found that men with a higher lutein intake had a 19 percent decreased rate of cataract surgery.

• The Blue Mountain Eye Study from Australia found that “long-term use of multivitamins, B group, and vitamin A supplements was associated with reduced prevalence of either nuclear or cortical cataracts.” Folate and vitamin B12 supplementation was also found to be useful.

• The Nurses’ Health Study from Boston found that vitamin C intake was associated with a 64 percent decreased cataract risk among women who used vitamin C for ...

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...