Parkinson's Diseases Specialist La Grande OR

In the more likely scenario, having only one copy of the mutation increases the risk of the disease, but the disease will only express itself in the presence of other genetic or environmental factors.

Richard B Rosenbaum, MD
(503) 963-3100
5050 NE Hoyt St
Portland, OR
Business
The Oregon Clinic Neurology
Specialties
Neurology

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Colin Matthew Roberts, MD
Portland, OR
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1995

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James Joseph Cereghino, MD
(503) 494-1850
3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd
Portland, OR
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1964

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Norwyn Robert Newby, MD
(541) 382-3344
2275 NE Doctors Dr
Bend, OR
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1970

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Glenn L Keiper
(541) 485-2357
1410 Oak St
Eugene, OR
Specialty
Neurosurgery

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Daniel K Friedman
(503) 681-0816
364 Se 8th Ave
Hillsboro, OR
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
David Jay Silver
(503) 230-1908
5050 Ne Hoyt St
Portland, OR
Specialty
Neurosurgery

Data Provided by:
Traci D Ryan, MD
(503) 624-6784
15518 SW 114th Ct Unit 57
Tigard, OR
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Baylor Coll Of Med, Houston Tx 77030
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
William D Platt, MD
(503) 640-4697
405 SE 8th Ave
Hillsboro, OR
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided by:
Bruce F Powell, MD
Hillsboro, OR
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Pa, Philadelphia Pa 19129
Graduation Year: 1988

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Another Genetic Risk for Parkinson's

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By Kathryn Ayers

A number of small studies have suggested that a mutation in the gene that produces the protein alpha-synuclein (SNCA) may play a role in the onset of the degenerative neurological condition known as Parkinson’s disease. Now a large multi-nation study confirms that the mutation can increase the risk of Parkinson’s by 50 percent. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic sifted data on some 2,700 Parkinson’s patients and an equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals and determined that “the SNCA gene is not only a rare cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson’s disease in some families, but also a susceptibility gene for Parkinson’s disease at the population level.” People who have the misfortune of inheriting copies of the gene mutation from both parents—a rare occurrence—will contract Parkinson’s. In the more likely scenario, having only one copy of the mutation increases the risk of the disease, but the disease will only express itself in the presence of other genetic or environmental factors. The researchers estimate that the SNCA gene accounts for roughly 3 percent of all Parkinson’s cases—about the same, they say, “as the population effect of other common variants implicated in Parkinson’s disease.”

Author: Kathryn Ayers

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