Alzheimer's Health Clinics Stamford CT

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Brighton Gardens of Stamford
(203) 322-2100
59 Roxbury Rd
Stamford, CT
Services
Assisted Living Facility, Alz/Dementia Support

Data Provided by:
Atria, East Northport
(631) 757-8000
10 Cheshire Place
East Northport, NY
Services
Assisted Living Facility, Alz/Dementia Support

Data Provided by:
Michelle Presser
Shelburne Rd & W Broad St
Stamford, CT
Specialty
Psychiatry, Alzheimer's Specialist

Vn & Hospice Care Of Southwestern Ct
(203) 967-5905
1029 East Main Street
Stamford, CT
Specialty
Hospices

Sheryl Siegel
1 Stamford Forum
Stamford, CT
Specialty
Neurology, Alzheimer's Specialist

Atria Briarcliffe Manor
(914) 923-4400
1025 Pleasantville Road
Briarcliff Manor, NY
Services
Assisted Living Facility, Alz/Dementia Support

Data Provided by:
Caring Inc
(203) 325-2225
733 Summer Street
Stamford, CT
Specialty
Home Health Agencies

Mediplex Of Stamford
(203) 329-4026
710 Long Ridge Road
Stamford, CT
Specialty
Skilled Nursing Facilities

Willem Roosen
Shelburne Rd & W Broad St
Stamford, CT
Specialty
Psychiatry, Alzheimer's Specialist

Richard Kaiser
(203) 359-1112
26 Strawberry Hill Ave
Stamford, CT
Specialty
Psychiatry, Alzheimer's Specialist

Data Provided by:

Sniff Out Alzheimer�s

Provided by: 

By Vicki Gerson

Can you identify these scents in a scratch-and-sniff test: banana, onion, soap, cinnamon, lemon, black pepper, smoke, paint thinner, pineapple, gasoline, rose, and chocolate? If so, this simple test may one day detect Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, studied about 600 adults, with an average age of 80, who showed no sign of cognitive impairment at the start of the study. Participants were asked to identify each of the above odors from one of four scents. Retested once a year for up to five years, participants also underwent a clinical evaluation that included a neurological examination and testing of their cognitive function. Over that five-year period, 30 percent developed mild cognitive impairment. The likelihood of impairment increased as the ability to identify odors decreased; those who scored below average on the smell test were 50 percent more likely to have developed impairment than those who scored above average. When researchers adjusted for smoking and a history of strokes—both of which can impair odor identification—the results still held. The researchers concluded that a decline in smell may indicate an early stage of Alzheimer’s and that this scent test may be helpful in detecting the disease.

Author: Vicki Gerson

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