Alzheimer's Health Clinics North Augusta SC

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Brookdale Place of Augusta
(706) 738-6003
326 Boy Scout Road
Augusta, GA
Services
Assisted Living Facility, Alz/Dementia Support

Data Provided by:
Nhc Healthcare, North Augusta
(803) 278-4272
200 Austin Graybill Rd Box 7979
North Augusta, SC
Specialty
Skilled Nursing Facilities

Eman Sharawy
1350 Walton Way
Augusta, GA
Specialty
Psychiatry, Alzheimer's Specialist

Hung Nguyen
1120 15th St
Augusta, GA
Specialty
Psychiatry, Alzheimer's Specialist

Henry Hobby
1120 15th St
Augusta, GA
Specialty
Psychiatry, Alzheimer's Specialist

University Home Health
(803) 637-9200
215 B Edgefield Rd
North Augusta, SC
Specialty
Home Health Agencies

Anne Maria Rehabilitation & Nsg Ctr
(803) 278-2170
1200 Talisman Drive Box 6277
North Augusta, SC
Specialty
Skilled Nursing Facilities

Diana Thorne
(706) 737-6557
820 Saint Sebastian Way
Augusta, GA
Specialty
Psychiatry, Alzheimer's Specialist

Kapil Sethi
Medical College Of Georgia
Augusta, GA
Specialty
Neurology, Alzheimer's Specialist

Sherrill Loring
(706) 722-7353
820 Saint Sebastin Way #4d
Augusta, GA
Specialty
Neurology, Alzheimer's Specialist

Data Provided by:

Sniff Out Alzheimer�s

Provided by: 

By Vicki Gerson

Can you identify these scents in a scratch-and-sniff test: banana, onion, soap, cinnamon, lemon, black pepper, smoke, paint thinner, pineapple, gasoline, rose, and chocolate? If so, this simple test may one day detect Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, studied about 600 adults, with an average age of 80, who showed no sign of cognitive impairment at the start of the study. Participants were asked to identify each of the above odors from one of four scents. Retested once a year for up to five years, participants also underwent a clinical evaluation that included a neurological examination and testing of their cognitive function. Over that five-year period, 30 percent developed mild cognitive impairment. The likelihood of impairment increased as the ability to identify odors decreased; those who scored below average on the smell test were 50 percent more likely to have developed impairment than those who scored above average. When researchers adjusted for smoking and a history of strokes—both of which can impair odor identification—the results still held. The researchers concluded that a decline in smell may indicate an early stage of Alzheimer’s and that this scent test may be helpful in detecting the disease.

Author: Vicki Gerson

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