Alternative Treatments for Arthritis Pikeville KY

T’ai chi, as a meditative martial art involves the fluid repetition of a series of gentle movements called forms. People with arthritis benefit tremendously from the balance, stamina, endurance, focus, breathing, and social benefits they get from doing t’ai chi.

Haider Abbas, MD
(336) 716-4202
701 College Hl
Williamson, WV
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Rawalpindi Med Coll, Univ Of Punjab, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1992
Hospital
Hospital: Williamson Memorial Hospital, Williamson, Wv

Data Provided by:
Dr.Asad Fraser
(270) 781-5111
201 Park Street
Bowling Green, KY
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Allama Iqbal Med Coll, Univ Of Punjab, Lahore
Year of Graduation: 1983
Speciality
Rheumatologist
General Information
Hospital: Private Office
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.1, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Syed Haider Abbas
(859) 258-4450
1221 S Broadway
Lexington, KY
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
John Wesley Melton III, MD
(301) 215-7600
3900 Kresge Way
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1967
Hospital
Hospital: Sibley Mem Hosp, Washington, Dc; Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, Dc
Group Practice: Arthritis Center

Data Provided by:
Gerald Sims
(270) 688-1200
815 E Parrish Ave
Owensboro, KY
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Steven Harry Stern, MD
(502) 583-5836
Prospect, KY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Eastern Va Med Sch Of The Med Coll Of Hampton Roads, Norfolk Va 23501
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Robert Warren Hoffman, DO
(502) 897-1604
4004 Dupont Cir
Louisville, KY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Chicago Coll Of Osteo Med, Midwestern Univ, Chicago Il 60615
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided by:
Kara Murphy Schmidt
(502) 629-7702
210 E Gray St
Louisville, KY
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Mohammed Adnaan Siddiqui, MD
(270) 769-2475
1120 Woodland Dr
Elizabethtown, KY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Dow Med Coll, Univ Of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided by:
Rita Marie Egan, MD
(859) 276-1440
333 Waller Ave Ste 100
Lexington, KY
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Case Western Reserve Univ Sch Of Med, Cleveland Oh 44106
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
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Alternative Treatments for Arthritis

Provided by: 

By Cara McDonald

Lenore Pristash was determined to cope with the arthritis in her neck and spine—after all, the 66-year-old was a former aerobics instructor and lifelong golfer, and she was used to being in control of her body. But when her doctor recommended neck surgery to remove bone spurs, the first words out of her mouth were, “No way.” “I was afraid I would lose the ability to do the things I love,” she says.

The Conventional Rx: Pristash was taking glucosamine and chondroitin (joint supplements that aid in cartilage repair), as well as Celebrex, a prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that irritated her stomach and increased her risk of heart attack and stroke.

The Alternative Rx: T’ai chi. This meditative martial art involves the fluid repetition of a series of gentle movements called forms. Pristash started attending a weekly class with a t’ai chi instructor and supplemented with DVD workouts at home.“People with arthritis benefit tremendously from the balance, stamina, endurance, focus, breathing, and social benefits they get from doing t’ai chi,” says Pristash’s instructor, Theresa Lilla, who herself has arthritis in her neck and knees. “It helps you to calm and connect with yourself, and when you’re in pain, that’s important.”

The Outcome:
Before t’ai chi, Pristash could move her head only 40 degrees to the left; now she can turn it all the way to her shoulder. Her joints don’t crackle like they used to, and she stopped taking Celebrex. But a surprise benefit has been the mental effect: “T’ai chi enables you to settle your body into yourself and the earth; it sounds corny, but that’s what you do,” Pristash says. “T’ai chi has helped make this disease tolerable.” —Cara McDonald

Author: Cara McDonald

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