Leaky Gut Syndrome Prevention Diet Sioux City IA

There have been quite a few “gold standard” studies supporting the idea that for certain kids, dietary changes can be a big help for those who have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Bonnie J Lohry
(712) 294-5000
2501 Pierce St
Sioux City, IA
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Curves
(712) 258-5494
1551 Indian Hills Dr Ste 9
Sioux City, IA
 
Philip J Muller, DO
(712) 234-0220
600 4th St Ste 501
Sioux City, IA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hlth Sci, Coll Of Osteo Med, Kansas City Mo 64124
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Alina Budu, MD
(712) 234-0220
600 4th St Ste 501
Sioux City, IA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Inst De Med Si Farm, Carol Davila, Bucharest, Romania
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided by:
Kunal Kumar Patra, MD
(712) 274-6729
3549 Southern Hills Dr
Sioux City, IA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Scb Med Coll, Utkal Univ, Cuttak, Orissa, India
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Complete Nutrition
(712) 276-7348
5004 Sergeant Rd
Sioux City, IA
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Complete Nutrition
(712) 276-7348
5004 Sergeant Rd
Sioux City, IA
 
Dale Robert Wassmuth, MD
(712) 234-0220
600 4th St Ste 501
Sioux City, IA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med, Iowa City Ia 52242
Graduation Year: 1962
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Med Ctr, Sioux City, Ia; St Lukes Reg Medctr, Sioux City, Ia
Group Practice: Midlands Clinic

Data Provided by:
Richard Calvin Brown Jr, MD
(712) 293-4753
2101 Court St
Sioux City, IA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loma Linda Univ Sch Of Med, Loma Linda Ca 92350
Graduation Year: 1976
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Med Ctr, Sioux City, Ia; St Lukes Reg Medctr, Sioux City, Ia
Group Practice: Family Services

Data Provided by:
James Michael Duggan, DO
(712) 274-4200
4301 Sergeant Rd
Sioux City, IA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Des Moines Univ, Coll Osteo Med & Surg, Des Moines Ia 50312
Graduation Year: 1967

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About Kid Diets and ADHD

Provided by: 

By Timothy Culbert, M.D.

Q: My eight-year-old son has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Is there any chance that changing his diet will make a difference?

A:
There have been quite a few “gold standard” studies supporting the idea that for certain kids, dietary changes can be a big help.

One type of diet (known as oligo-antigenic) is fairly radical; it eliminates ingredients that are thought to provoke allergies, including dairy, gluten, refined sugars, dyes, preservatives, and additives. A theory as to why this might make a difference has to do with a phenomenon called leaky gut syndrome. Normally, the intestinal lining serves as a good filtering system for proteins like those that trigger allergies. But in some people, the gut seems to have a sort of “leak” that allows these proteins to get into the bloodstream. At that point the immune system reacts, and this can contribute to behavioral problems.

The pure form of this diet is very restrictive and can be difficult to stick to. It allows only two types of meat (lamb and turkey), two types of starches (rice and potatoes), two types of vegetables (cabbage and carrots), and two fruits (apples and bananas).

A more practical approach might be to test potentially troublesome foods one at a time. Eliminate dairy, say, for three weeks to see if any significant changes occur. For most people, this approach is pretty doable, and there’s very little downside to trying it.

As a general guideline, I’d also suggest giving the child unprocessed and organic foods, to avoid contributing any additional toxic load to the body.

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