Leaky Gut Syndrome Prevention Diet Forrest City AR

There have been quite a few “gold standard” studies supporting the idea that for certain kids, dietary changes can be a big help for those who have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Ashok R Rao, MD
(870) 270-8765
2262 Sfc 311 Apt 4
Forrest City, AR
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Osmania Med Coll, Univ Hlth Sci, Vijayawada, Hyderabad, Ap, India
Graduation Year: 1975

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Jyothsna Kumar, MD
(870) 633-5016
1801 Lindauer Rd
Forrest City, AR
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Grant Med Coll, Univ Of Bombay, Bombay, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1987

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Garland Doty Murphy III, MD
(479) 659-0111
Springdale, AR
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 1967

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Dryer Chiropractic
(870) 935-0102
2912 Browns Ln
Jonesboro, AR
Industry
Nutritionist, Personal Trainer

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Loomis Chiropractic
(501) 609-0575
306 W Saint Louis St
Hot Springs National Park, AR
Industry
Nutritionist, Psychologist

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Shamshad Muhammad Haroon, MD
Forrest City, AR
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Dow Med Coll, Univ Of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided by:
Yolonda Renee Pickett, MD
Forrest City, AR
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tn, Memphis, Coll Of Med, Memphis Tn 38163
Graduation Year: 2001

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Reynolds Gus Dr
(501) 723-8386
55 Stanfield Rd
Edgemont, AR
Industry
Nutritionist

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AK Medical Support Services
(479) 394-1600
300 Crestwood Cir
Mena, AR
Industry
Nutritionist

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Complete Care
(479) 783-7880
4120 Rogers Ave
Fort Smith, AR
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Nutritionist

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About Kid Diets and ADHD

Provided by: 

By Timothy Culbert, M.D.

Q: My eight-year-old son has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Is there any chance that changing his diet will make a difference?

A:
There have been quite a few “gold standard” studies supporting the idea that for certain kids, dietary changes can be a big help.

One type of diet (known as oligo-antigenic) is fairly radical; it eliminates ingredients that are thought to provoke allergies, including dairy, gluten, refined sugars, dyes, preservatives, and additives. A theory as to why this might make a difference has to do with a phenomenon called leaky gut syndrome. Normally, the intestinal lining serves as a good filtering system for proteins like those that trigger allergies. But in some people, the gut seems to have a sort of “leak” that allows these proteins to get into the bloodstream. At that point the immune system reacts, and this can contribute to behavioral problems.

The pure form of this diet is very restrictive and can be difficult to stick to. It allows only two types of meat (lamb and turkey), two types of starches (rice and potatoes), two types of vegetables (cabbage and carrots), and two fruits (apples and bananas).

A more practical approach might be to test potentially troublesome foods one at a time. Eliminate dairy, say, for three weeks to see if any significant changes occur. For most people, this approach is pretty doable, and there’s very little downside to trying it.

As a general guideline, I’d also suggest giving the child unprocessed and organic foods, to avoid contributing any additional toxic load to the body.

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