Seasonal Affective Disorder Treatment North Kansas City MO

The primary cause of SAD is light deprivation, so light therapy ranks as the first line of defense. Light boxes contain white fluorescent bulbs behind a plastic UV filter, and regular use can reset your body clock and increase serotonin. Effective light boxes generate 10,000 lux (a measurement of intensity); to put that therapeutic amount in perspective, traditional lighting produces 300 to 500 lux, and the sun produces more than 100,000 lux on a bright summer day.

Massage Matters
(816) 454-5751
851 NW 45th St
Kansas City, MO
Industry
Massage Practitioner, Mental Health Professional, Psychologist

Data Provided by:
Bruce Koonts Manley
(816) 223-6128
4380 N Oak Trfy
Kansas City, MO
Services
Adjustment Disorder (e.g., bereavement, acad, job, mar, or fam prob), Gender Issues (MenÆs/WomenÆs Issues), Personality Disorder (e.g., borderline, antisocial), Psychological Assessment, Substance-Related Disorder (e.g., abuse or dependency involving drug/alcohol)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Children (3-12 yrs.)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Missouri - Kansas City
Credentialed Since: 1999-01-22

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Chitra Chinnaswamy
(816) 454-8475
4444 N Belleview
Kansas City, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry

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Cindy G Ruttan
(816) 474-4920
825 Euclid Avenue
Kansas City, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry, Child Psychiatry

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Lilac Center LLC
(816) 221-0305
1029 Pennsylvania Ave
Kansas City, MO
Industry
Mental Health Professional

Data Provided by:
Innocent Okwudili Anya
(816) 283-3396
2301 Burlington St Ste 200
North Kansas City, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Jack Edmisten
(816) 474-4920
825 Euclid Avenue
Kansas City, MO
Specialty
Psychiatry

Data Provided by:
Robert G. Urie
(816) 474-7322
Urie & Urie, Inc.
North Kansas City, MO
Services
Individual Psychotherapy, Substance-Related Disorder (e.g., abuse or dependency involving drug/alcohol), Gender Issues (MenÆs/WomenÆs Issues), Mood Disorder (e.g., depression, manic-depressive disorder)
Ages Served
Adults (18-64 yrs.)
Adolescents (13-17 yrs.)
Older adults (65 yrs. or older)
Education Info
Doctoral Program: University of Kansas
Credentialed Since: 1982-07-21

Data Provided by:
Alan Glaros
(816) 654-7522
Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences
Kancas City, MO
Services
Behavioral Health Intervention involving Medical Conditions/Disorder, Biofeedback, Behavioral Health Intervention involving Primary Care
Education Info
Doctoral Program: Stony Brook University/SUNY
Credentialed Since: 2004-08-12

Data Provided by:
Commcare
(816) 472-9012
106 W 14th St
Kansas City, MO
Industry
Mental Health Professional

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A Look at Seasonal Affective Disorder

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By Matthew Solan

For 12 years Helena Davis’ life resembled a light switch. When daylight-
saving time arrived in spring, it flipped on—she felt energetic, focused, and active. In winter, however, it switched off. She struggled to do the simplest household chores. Her weight ballooned. She could go to work and function at some level, she says, but it was obvious that something was wrong. “All winter I felt like a slug moving around in peanut butter,” says Davis, now 64.

She finally realized that her mood change coincided with her move to upstate New York, an area with few sunny days. A visit to her doctor filled in the diagnosis: Davis was one of 10 million to 25 million Americans, 75 percent of whom are women, who suffer from a subtype of depression called seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

You’ve no doubt heard of SAD. Also called “winter blues,” it often gets mistaken for clinical depression as the two share many symptoms—sadness, anxiety, lethargy, lack of sleep, diminished sex drive, and increased appetite. The difference lies in their duration and severity, according to Norman Rosenthal, MD, author of Winter Blues: Everything You Need to Know to Beat Seasonal Affective Disorder (The Guilford Press, 2006). SAD typically strikes around September or October and then fades away in March and April. (Depression on the other hand can occur year-round.) Merely troublesome and potentially disruptive at first, SAD can be controlled if you take appropriate action, but “left unchecked, the changes in mood and behavior can become so powerful they can create significant problems in your life and may manifest into year-round major depression if not addressed,” says Rosenthal.

Light therapy
The primary cause of SAD is light deprivation, so light therapy ranks as the first line of defense. Light boxes contain white fluorescent bulbs behind a plastic UV filter, and regular use can reset your body clock and increase serotonin. Effective light boxes generate 10,000 lux (a measurement of intensity); to put that therapeutic amount in perspective, traditional lighting produces 300 to 500 lux, and the sun produces more than 100,000 lux on a bright summer day.

Rosenthal recommends using light therapy for about 20 minutes a day at first, ideally in the morning. How early depends on the individual’s body clock, says Michael Terman, PhD, who heads the Center for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York.

If you suffer from SAD, try placing a light box 1 to 3 feet away while you eat, read, go through your mail, or meditate. If your symptoms remain unchanged, increase your treatment to 45 minutes a day, says Rosenthal. Reevaluate your symptoms on a weekly basis and make adjustments. “You should feel the effects within two to four days,” says Rosenthal. “Almost everyone should feel the benefits within two weeks.” (Find light boxes at www.lightforhealth.com or www.lite book.com.) Brighten up your living and...

Author: Matthew Solan

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