Endocrine Specialist Clarksdale MS

Endocrine disrupters are chemicals found in scads of widely used products. They resemble hormones in their chemical structure, leading many researchers to believe that the body treats them as hormones, too. Once inside us, endocrine disrupters interfere with normal hormonal processes, causing genetic damage, especially in developing fetuses and children.

Jewell Catherine Ward, MD
(662) 377-2189
1665 S Green St
Tupelo, MS
Specialties
Medical Genetics, Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided by:
Michael Todd Bashford, MD
Ocean Springs, MS
Specialties
Medical Genetics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Columbia Univ Coll Of Physicians And Surgeons, New York Ny 10032
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided by:
Phillip Blaine Ley, MD
(601) 948-1411
1421 N State St Ste 304
Jackson, MS
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Baylor Coll Of Med, Houston Tx 77030
Graduation Year: 1988
Hospital
Hospital: Rankin Med Ctr, Brandon, Ms
Group Practice: Surgical Clinic Assoc

Data Provided by:
Stephanie L Moore
(601) 582-2619
66 Old Airport Rd
Hattiesburg, MS
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Jenny Craig
(866) 622-9370
900 E County Line Rd
Ridgeland, MS
Alternate Phone Number
(866) 622-9370
Services
Weight Loss, Diet Plans

Hans Georg-Otto Bock, MD
(601) 984-6440
U Miss Medicine Ctr-Dept Prev Medicine 2500 North
Jackson, MS
Specialties
Medical Genetics, Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Vanderbilt Univ Sch Of Med, Nashville Tn 37232
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided by:
Michael Wayne Mc Clellan, MD
(228) 377-6393
301 Fisher St Ste 1A132
Biloxi, MS
Specialties
Medical Genetics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med, Denver Co 80262
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
Delta Nutrition
(662) 334-1348
585 Tennessee Gas Rd,# 1
Greenville, MS
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Susan Dean Landry
(601) 906-7715
1507 Kimwood Circle
Jackson, MS
 
Shelley Jones
(662) 377-6275
4250 S Eason Blvd
Tupelo, MS
Services
Diabetes Education, Nutrition Counseling, Weight Management, Diet Plan, Sports Nutrition, First Consultation, Weight Loss
Hours
Sunday:Closed
Monday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday:9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed

Data Provided by:

A Clear & Plastic Danger

Provided by: 

By Alan Reder

In Hollywood’s 1967 classic The Graduate, our floundering hero, recent law school grad Ben Braddock, wonders what to do with his life when a family friend offers him a surefire career tip: “I want to say one word to you—plastics.” While Braddock doesn’t follow that advice, it was indeed solid counsel for that era. In 2008, however, plastics face a far more troubled future. The crux of the problem? Endocrine disruption.

Endocrine disrupters are chemicals found in scads of widely used products. They resemble hormones in their chemical structure, leading many researchers to believe that the body treats them as hormones, too. Once inside us, endocrine disrupters interfere with normal hormonal processes, causing genetic damage, especially in developing fetuses and children. Among other things, the chemicals throw sexual development off course, make reproductive systems go haywire, and cause hormone- related cancers. While the only proof of harm comes from animal testing, the threat appears to extend to humans as well.

Endocrine disruption flared as a hot topic in 1996, sparked by the book Our Stolen Future (Penguin, 1996), by zoologist Theo Colborn and others. By tying some alarming research to some just-as-alarming human trends, Colborn demonstrated that major impacts from endocrine disrupters might already be affecting the human population. For instance, the authors suggested that breast cancer rates, which have risen sharply since the mid-20th century, might be related to the widespread use of pesticides and herbicides that contain hormone-mimicking chemicals. Studies at the Strang Cornell Cancer Research Laboratory showed that the chemicals appear to push estrogen metabolism in a direction that profoundly boosts cancer risk.

In the 12 years since Colborn published Our Stolen Future, the federal government has responded to research-based questions about endocrine disrupters mainly by protecting corporations that profit from them. Yet evidence that Colborn and her coauthors were right continues to mount.

For a microcosm of what’s been happening with endocrine disrupters in the US, consider the case of the widely used chemical bisphenol-A (BPA). Industry loves BPA because it makes polycarbonate plastic clear and nearly unbreakable. An extensive body of literature supports the view that this chemical, originally developed as a synthetic estrogen, can cause hormonal chaos. “We’re talking about hundreds of studies with large sample sizes by the world’s premier scientists in endocrinology, neurobiology, and developmental biology—published in the major journals in the world,” says University of Missouri-Columbia neurobiologist Fred vom Saal, a pioneer in BPA research. But the FDA has so far declared BPA safe, citing instead two tiny studies. Those studies, unlike the independent research that counters them, were funded by the chemical industry.

The government has also failed to act against phthalates—chemicals used mainly to ...

Author: Alan Reder

Copyright 1999-2009 Natural Solutions: Vibrant Health, Balanced Living/Alternative Medicine/InnoVisi...