Ginkgo Biloba Treatment North Pole AK

Here are 10 to consider. Ginkgo biloba. Almost universally accepted as an effective treatment for deteriorating memory and early'stage Alzheimer's disease, this age-old herb boasts high levels of antioxidants and enhances blood flow in the brain.

Dr.Janice Onorato
(907) 452-1739
1919 Lathrop St # 220
Fairbanks, AK
Gender
F
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Hospital: Fairbanks Memorial
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.7, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

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Dr.JAMES Foelsch
(907) 452-1739
1919 Lathrop St # 220
Fairbanks, AK
Gender
M
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.2, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided by:
James M Foelsch, MD
(907) 452-1739
1919 Lathrop St Ste 220
Fairbanks, AK
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mo, Columbia Sch Of Med, Columbia Mo 65212
Graduation Year: 1980
Hospital
Hospital: Fairbanks Mem Hosp/Denali Ctr, Fairbanks, Ak
Group Practice: Fairbanks Psychiatric & Neurological Clnc Pc

Data Provided by:
Ronald Anthony Martino, MD
(907) 452-1739
1919 Lathrop St Ste 220
Fairbanks, AK
Specialties
Neurology, Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided by:
Aaron Johnson
(907) 261-3650
3200 Providence Dr
Anchorage, AK
Specialty
Neurology, Pediatric Neurology, Sleep Medicine

Data Provided by:
Irvin A Rothrock
(907) 452-1739
1919 Lathrop St
Fairbanks, AK
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Ronald A Martino
(907) 452-1739
1919 Lathrop St
Fairbanks, AK
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Janice Onorato, MD
(907) 452-1739
1919 Lathrop St Ste 220
Fairbanks, AK
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
James M Foelsch
(907) 452-1739
1919 Lathrop St
Fairbanks, AK
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Louis L Kralick
(907) 258-6999
3220 Providence Dr
Anchorage, AK
Specialty
Neurosurgery

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8 Ways to Feed Your Brain

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It really is all in your head—all three pounds and 100 billion neurons of it, that super biocomputer affectionately known as the brain. And now that Americans live, on average, for 78 years (three decades longer than they did in 1900), it doesn’t take, well, a brain surgeon to figure out that nurturing the brain’s health makes perfect sense.

Studies clearly illustrate how lifestyle choices can directly impact the brain’s physiological well-being. Mental stimulation, loving companionship, social interaction, regular exercise, and a healthy diet undoubtedly benefit the brain—and the individual as a whole. Of course, our genes have their own fateful designs, and Father Time ultimately takes his toll—with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, stroke, or depression as the potential fee. Fortunately, a growing body of research suggests that certain natural substances may help protect the brain during aging, along with possibly enhancing its function in the short and long terms. Here are 10 to consider. Ginkgo biloba. Almost universally accepted as an effective treatment for deteriorating memory and early-stage Alzheimer’s disease, this age-old herb boasts high levels of antioxidants and enhances blood flow in the brain.

1. Omega-3 fatty acids

Used to manufacture and maintain cell membranes, omega-3s act as anti-inflammatories and mildly thin the blood. Omega-3s come in three major types: Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Omega-3s, especially DHA and EPA, may augment brain function by fortifying the myelin sheath, a fatty membrane that covers and insulates each nerve cell. They might also help the blood deliver nutrients directly into neurons. Results from a Harvard Medical School-McLean Hospital study found that DHA/EPA supplements significantly reduced depression and mania in bipolar-disorder patients. Dosage: 200 mg to 2 grams/day.

2. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)

CoQ10 activates specific enzymes in the “powerhouses” of cells, the mitochondria, to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the cells’ primary energy source. Then, in its role as an antioxidant, it helps neutralize the free radicals that get created during ATP production. Scientists from University of California, San Diego School of Medicine demonstrated that Parkinson’s patients had lower levels of CoQ10 than healthy controls, possibly indicating diminished ATP production in the patients’ brains. The research also showed that CoQ10 supplements actually slowed the functional decline of early-stage Parkinson’s. Dosage: 30 mg to 200 mg/day.

Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALC)

Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC helps deliver long-chain fatty acids into the nerve cells’ mitochondria for ATP production and acts as a potent antioxidant. Recent research suggests that levels of ALC decrease with age, which may lead to decreased ATP production and free-radical stress in neurons, potential factors in the loss of mental acuity or age-related demen...

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