Ginkgo Biloba Treatment Fenton MO

Here are 10 to consider. Ginkgo biloba. Almost universally accepted as an effective treatment for deteriorating memory and early'stage Alzheimer's disease, this age-old herb boasts high levels of antioxidants and enhances blood flow in the brain.

James F Alonso, MD
(314) 487-3155
Fenton, MO
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mo-Kansas City Sch Of Med, Kansas City Mo 64108
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided by:
Dr.Paul Young
(314) 535-4000
10012 Kennerly Rd # 400
Saint Louis, MO
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: St Louis Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1975
Speciality
Neurosurgeon
General Information
Hospital: St Marys Health Center, Saint Louis, Mo
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.0, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Faisal J Albanna
(314) 849-9090
5000 Cedar Plaza Pkwy
Saint Louis, MO
Specialty
Neurosurgery

Data Provided by:
Kapal Dev Datta, MD
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll, Guru Nanak Dev Univ, Amritsar, Punjab, India
Graduation Year: 1952

Data Provided by:
John Joseph O'Keefe
(314) 849-5665
12810 Tesson Ferry Rd
Saint Louis, MO
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Brent Allen Beson, MD
Valley Park, MO
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided by:
Dr.Richard Head
(636) 946-1152
10004 Kennerly Rd # 391B
Saint Louis, MO
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1982
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.3, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Dr.Faisal Albanna
(314) 849-9090
5000 Cedar Plaza Pkwy # 220
Saint Louis, MO
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Wien, Med Fak, Wien
Year of Graduation: 1978
Speciality
Neurosurgeon
General Information
Hospital: Des Peres, Saint Louis, Mo
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.6, out of 5 based on 7, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Faisal Jabriel Albanna, MD
(314) 849-9090
5000 Cedar Plaza Pkwy Ste 220
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Neurological Surgery, Spinal Cord Injury
Gender
Male
Languages
German, Arabic
Education
Medical School: Univ Wien, Med Fak, Wien, Austria (407-26 3/1938 To 6/1945)
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: Des Peres, Saint Louis, Mo; St Anthonys Med Ctr, Saint Louis, Mo
Group Practice: Albanna Neurosurgical Conslnts

Data Provided by:
Mary Kathryn Bowen, MD
(314) 845-1780
10010 Kennerly Rd
Saint Louis, MO
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1981

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8 Ways to Feed Your Brain

Provided by: 

It really is all in your head—all three pounds and 100 billion neurons of it, that super biocomputer affectionately known as the brain. And now that Americans live, on average, for 78 years (three decades longer than they did in 1900), it doesn’t take, well, a brain surgeon to figure out that nurturing the brain’s health makes perfect sense.

Studies clearly illustrate how lifestyle choices can directly impact the brain’s physiological well-being. Mental stimulation, loving companionship, social interaction, regular exercise, and a healthy diet undoubtedly benefit the brain—and the individual as a whole. Of course, our genes have their own fateful designs, and Father Time ultimately takes his toll—with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, stroke, or depression as the potential fee. Fortunately, a growing body of research suggests that certain natural substances may help protect the brain during aging, along with possibly enhancing its function in the short and long terms. Here are 10 to consider. Ginkgo biloba. Almost universally accepted as an effective treatment for deteriorating memory and early-stage Alzheimer’s disease, this age-old herb boasts high levels of antioxidants and enhances blood flow in the brain.

1. Omega-3 fatty acids

Used to manufacture and maintain cell membranes, omega-3s act as anti-inflammatories and mildly thin the blood. Omega-3s come in three major types: Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Omega-3s, especially DHA and EPA, may augment brain function by fortifying the myelin sheath, a fatty membrane that covers and insulates each nerve cell. They might also help the blood deliver nutrients directly into neurons. Results from a Harvard Medical School-McLean Hospital study found that DHA/EPA supplements significantly reduced depression and mania in bipolar-disorder patients. Dosage: 200 mg to 2 grams/day.

2. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)

CoQ10 activates specific enzymes in the “powerhouses” of cells, the mitochondria, to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the cells’ primary energy source. Then, in its role as an antioxidant, it helps neutralize the free radicals that get created during ATP production. Scientists from University of California, San Diego School of Medicine demonstrated that Parkinson’s patients had lower levels of CoQ10 than healthy controls, possibly indicating diminished ATP production in the patients’ brains. The research also showed that CoQ10 supplements actually slowed the functional decline of early-stage Parkinson’s. Dosage: 30 mg to 200 mg/day.

Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALC)

Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC helps deliver long-chain fatty acids into the nerve cells’ mitochondria for ATP production and acts as a potent antioxidant. Recent research suggests that levels of ALC decrease with age, which may lead to decreased ATP production and free-radical stress in neurons, potential factors in the loss of mental acuity or age-related demen...

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